Creative Community Bulletin 31 January 2014

Great con­tent found by Pariah and shared to the de­sign and cre­ative com­mu­ni­ties on so­cial me­dia.

  • Schedule Important Work at 5pm for Maximum Concentration
    “Whether it’s that vi­tal phone call or the big prob­lem of the day, tackle that im­por­tant task at the end of the day, es­pe­cially around 5pm, be­cause your body is primed to con­cen­trate best at that time, says Fast Company.”
  • UK Government to Switch from Microsoft Office to Open Source Alternative Office Suite
    “Cabinet Office min­is­ter Francis Maude plans to stan­dard­ise on open for­mats to cut costs on Office suite and break ‘oli­gop­oly’ of IT sup­pli­ers”
  • UK Government to Switch from Microsoft Office to Open Source Alternative Office Suite
    “Cabinet Office min­is­ter Francis Maude plans to stan­dard­ise on open for­mats to cut costs on Office suite and break ‘oli­gop­oly’ of IT sup­pli­ers”
  • UK Government to Switch from Microsoft Office to Open Source Alternative Office Suite
    “Cabinet Office min­is­ter Francis Maude plans to stan­dard­ise on open for­mats to cut costs on Office suite and break ‘oli­gop­oly’ of IT sup­pli­ers”
  • NursingJobs​.us re­designs with­out IE7 sup­port, of­fers to buy new com­put­ers for cus­tomers stuck with IE7 (via @vlh)

    “Wayne Gretzky once said “skate where the puck is go­ing, not where it’s been” and, in the fast-evolving world of tech­nol­ogy, this is sound ad­vice that we have taken to heart as we launched the new NursingJobs​.us job board. The new site uses a more mod­ern in­ter­face that sup­ports the mo­biles and tablets that our users in­creas­ingly pre­fer.”

  • Why Weird People Are Often More Creative

    “When Albert Einstein came across a cig­a­rette butt, he would of­ten pick it up–fuel for the ol’ to­bacco pipe. When Charles Dickens walked around London, he would of­ten be wield­ing his umbrella–the best de­fense for imag­i­nary street urchins. When Björk goes to an awards show, she might dress like a swan–what could be more ge­nius? Or beau­ti­ful? Or weird?”

  • Print is Not Dead Yet — Typefi CEO Chandi Perera

    “One of the ear­li­est ci­ta­tions of the phrase “print is dead” comes from the 1984 movie Ghostbusters, but al­most 30 years later, print is cer­tainly not dead. Print pub­lish­ing still dri­ves on av­er­age 80% of rev­enues and close to 100% of the prof­its for gen­eral trade pub­lish­ers. But among ref­er­ence and sci­ence, tech­ni­cal and med­ical (STM) pub­lish­ers, dig­i­tal pub­lish­ing was em­braced quickly and openly at the ex­pense of print. ”

  • How to write a pro­fes­sional bio for LinkedIn, Twitter & more

    “A great bio dis­plays your per­son­al­ity and pro­fes­sion­al­ism year-round, and it’s also a quick and easy way for you to gar­ner in­ter­est from po­ten­tial em­ploy­ers, bring­ing you one step closer to the job of your dreams. Here are the most im­por­tant things you need to know when writ­ing dif­fer­ent types of pro­fes­sional bios.”

  • The Classic Bic Pen Now Works On Your Smartphone Display Too
    “Writing im­ple­ments aren’t go­ing to be sup­planted by touch­screen de­vices any­time soon. But that isn’t stop­ping Bic from hedg­ing its bets and en­sur­ing its clas­sic see-through plas­tic pens re­main rel­e­vant. The company’s new Cristal Stylus fea­ture…
  • Stand Out by Building Your Strengths, Rather Than Fixing Every Flaw
    “When it comes to self-improvement, there’s a ten­dency to fo­cus on things you don’t do well. That’s a never-ending bat­tle, though. Instead, fo­cus your time on the defin­ing, unique skills you pos­sess.”
  • Creative Illustrator Sees Life In Everyday Street Objects

    “Most of us rush through our every­day lives with­out notic­ing the beau­ti­ful things around us. Dutch il­lus­tra­tor Tineke Meirink of­fers a cre­ative and play­ful way of en­gag­ing with our sur­round­ings – just stop and watch, she says. Her blog “Stop:Watch” tick­les the imag­i­na­tion with a col­lec­tion of sim­ple street ob­jects that she has given life to by adding a min­i­mal dig­i­tal il­lus­tra­tion.”

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