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An Open Letter to Adobe About the Premature End of Adobe Touch Apps

2012-12-20-RIP-Adobe-Touch-Apps

On December 20th, 2012 Adobe qui­etly an­nounced via a blog post that it is dis­con­tin­u­ing sev­eral of the Adobe Touch apps. Those who missed the blog post may also have no­ticed that the touch apps sud­denly dis­ap­peared from the Creative Cloud dash­board.

Here’s what Jill Soley, Adobe Creative Cloud Team, wrote:

Over the past year, we’ve been ex­plor­ing how the cre­ative process can be aug­mented and en­hanced on touch de­vices. While some of our ef­forts have been suc­cess­ful, oth­ers have been less so. Therefore, start­ing to­day, we will no longer be up­dat­ing Adobe Debut, Adobe Collage, Adobe Proto, or the Android ver­sions of Adobe Ideas and Adobe Kuler.

Here’s my open let­ter to Adobe about that an­nounce­ment. Please feel free to ex­press your opin­ion as well.

———

Dear Adobe:

I just saw the post on the Creative Cloud Team Blog about can­celling most of the Adobe Touch apps. There are sev­eral dis­cus­sions spring­ing up about the de­ci­sion on Google+, Facebook, and else­where. The gen­eral feel­ing is that you made the de­ci­sion too soon, with many peo­ple chalk­ing it up to what ap­pears over the last year as Adobe’s in­creas­ing break­down of in­ter­nal com­mu­ni­ca­tions be­tween de­part­ments, pro­duct teams, and pro­gram managers—but that’s an­other dis­cus­sion for an­other day.

Focusing on the Touch Apps dis­con­tin­u­ance, I think the de­ci­sion is pre­ma­ture. Granted, I don’t know what your sales num­bers are for the Touch apps, what new di­rec­tions you may be pur­su­ing, but some of those apps are younger than 7 months. How can you ex­pect to see prod­ucts suc­ceed or fail in only 7 months or even in 18 months? Tablets and tablet soft­ware are still young and very much in a state of flux. We only this year moved into the “HD” range of tablets. 

Adobe’s mar­ket­ing of the Touch apps was over­shad­owed by the fo­cus on Creative Cloud and marred by the whole con­fu­sion of hav­ing to buy the Touch Apps from Apple and then seek a Creative Cloud sub­scrip­tion credit. How could the mar­ket even keep up with every­thing new out there? Since May 2012 Adobe and pro­gram part­ners (like me) have been pro­mot­ing all of the fol­low­ing at the same time.

  • 13 full pro­duct up­dates to CS6
  • Adobe Muse go­ing 1.0
  • Acrobat XI launch
  • A move to 12-month full pro­duct re­lease cy­cles
  • The Creative Cloud launch
  • Later the Creative Cloud for Teams launch
  • Creative Cloud Connection “com­ing soon”
  • Creative Cloud Connection ar­riv­ing
  • Edge Tools
  • Adobe mov­ing into the game de­vel­op­ment arena
  • The CS6 fo­cus on HTML5
  • The launch of Elearning Suite and up­date of its con­stituent prod­ucts
  • The launch of the Digital Publishing Suite
  • Story Plus
  • Digital Publishing Suite Single Edition go­ing free to pub­lish
  • Typekit roll-out
  • Lightroom 4 re­lease
  • Lightroom be­ing added to the Creative Cloud
  • The an­nounce­ment that Creative Cloud mem­bers get new fea­tures every 3-months
  • New fea­tures in Illustrator CS6 for Cloud sub­scribers
  • New fea­tures in InDesign CS6 for Cloud sub­scribers
  • New fea­tures in Photoshop CS6 for Cloud sub­scribers

And then, some­where amidst all that, is also…

  • New Adobe Proto
  • New Adobe Debut
  • New Adobe Collage
  • New Adobe Kuler for Android
  • Update to Adobe Ideas
  • Update to Photoshop Touch

Is it any sur­prise cus­tomers haven’t adopted all the Touch apps? They don’t know about all them be­cause they can’t keep up with all the an­nounce­ments and pro­mo­tion. It’s tough for me to do so and I’m an Adobe part­ner with early ac­cess to the in­for­ma­tion and then a job wherein I need to know every new app and ap­pli­ca­tion, every new fea­ture, and then fig­ure out how these can best ben­e­fit real-world cre­ative and pro­duc­tion work­flows. How can you ex­pect de­sign­ers work­ing 40–80 hours a week to keep up with all the new prod­ucts and an­nounce­ments from Adobe over the last 7 months? Cut them—and your apps—some slack.

Give the Touch Apps more time.

And stop charg­ing $9.99 for them. Give them away for a cou­ple of years to gain trac­tion. If you like, leave the in-app pur­chase up­grades like ex­tra lay­ers in Adobe Ideas, but make Adobe Ideas app it­self free. Make them all free.

These apps can have both short- and long-term pos­i­tive im­pact for Adobe. 

In the short term, they in­te­grate with full ap­pli­ca­tions in ways most peo­ple don’t know about—for in­stance, al­most no one knows Proto de­signs can be opened on the desk­top in Dreamweaver, com­plete with all the JavaScript, CSS, and other as­sets re­quired to re­pro­duce the en­tire Proto site sketch in a real site in­stantly pub­lish­able from Dreamweaver. The in­te­gra­tion with the desk­top apps is what will make these sell, and they, in turn, will help sell your desk­top prod­ucts. Competing mo­bile apps can’t match that in­te­gra­tion, so once the pub­lic learns about it, Adobe Touch apps will have greater value and dom­i­nate the mo­bile cre­ative space the way Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, Flash, Dreamweaver, and all the rest al­ready dom­i­nate the desk­top cre­ative space.

In the long-term, they provide two valu­able things: First, they keep an Adobe pres­ence on the next com­put­ing plat­form. Second, they prove that Adobe un­der­stands Mobile, which is im­por­tant be­cause Adobe was 10 years late to un­der­stand­ing the Web and 3 years late to get­ting it’s head into the whole smart­phone move­ment. After 10 years Adobe still doesn’t get ebooks (EPUB, MOBI, KF8, etc.), and the mar­ket knows that. You need the tablet pres­ence these apps give you.

In fact, I think you need to ex­pand the num­ber of plat­forms. Find some way to make these apps work on the cus­tomized Android 2.x plat­forms like the Kindle Fire line and NOOK Tablet line. Drop the price of the Touch apps from $9.99 to free, then use them as an egress into Creative Cloud. Let peo­ple see in each app not just their Creative Cloud-stored files but the desk­top apps they could get with a Creative Cloud sub­scrip­tion. Let them sub­scribe di­rectly within the Touch apps’ UIs.

At least, that’s my two cents.

Regards,

Pariah Burke
http://​iamPar​iah​.com@iamPariahhttp://​about​.me/​p​a​r​i​a​h​b​u​rke

Now in the Eastern time­zone!

Consulting & Training: ePub­lish­ing, Digital Publishing, Creative Workflows, Creative Software

Informing & Empowering Creative Professionals.™

———

Update 2013-01-02: Comments on Jill’s post are ap­par­ently dis­abled as there are none, and I know I sub­mit­ted one on December 20th.

Update: 2013-01-03: If you dis­cuss the ter­mi­na­tion (End of Life or EOL) of Adobe Touch apps in so­cial me­dia, please in­clude the hash­tag #AdobeTouch (as you can see here on Twitter) . I’ve been in­formed that Adobe only sees dis­cus­sions with hash­tags, and that Adobe cur­rently be­lieves no one is dis­cussing the Adobe Touch apps be­ing ended or in such a man­ner. Make sure Adobe sees your re­ac­tion by in­clud­ing the #AdobeTouch hash­tag in your con­ver­sa­tions.

Update 2013-01-04: Comments on Jill’s post have been restored—dozens of them. See com­ment be­low from Adobe rep­re­sen­ta­tive Rachel Luxemburg for the rea­son they didn’t ap­pear un­til now.

Update: 2013-01-07: I just got off a call with some peo­ple at Adobe, includ­ing Jill Soley, the au­thor of the orig­i­nal Touch Apps EOL blog post. There’s noth­ing con­crete to re­port yet, but a lot of peo­ple within Adobe are do­ing quite a lot of talk­ing and brain­storm­ing to­ward fig­ur­ing out ways to avoid sna­fus like this in the fu­ture.

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25 Responses

  1. Fireboy says:

    “Let them sub­scribe di­rectly within the Touch apps’ UIs.”

    Could you imag­ine them pay­ing 30% to Apple from a in-app pur­chase of the cre­ative cloud. NOT.

  2. Fireboy says:

    “Let them sub­scribe di­rectly within the Touch apps’ UIs.”

    Could you imag­ine them pay­ing 30% to Apple from a in-app pur­chase of the cre­ative cloud. NOT.

  3. Buck Sommerkamp says:

    And some­where in there (to add to your list) – Adobe FINALLY made Photoshop Touch avail­able to those of us with Nexus 7 de­vices who had been very dis­ap­pointed (for many months) that Photoshop Touch was not avail­able for this sparkling new tablet. Now that it works on the Nexus 7, it seems that my hope for other Touch apps has been dashed by this sud­den dis­con­tin­u­ance and (as usual) ter­ri­ble com­mu­ni­ca­tion from Adobe. It’s like the mid­night vote on the fis­cal cliff — way to qui­etly an­nounce some­thing over the hol­i­days. I’m glad I never re­ally trusted Proto; it looked so promis­ing but never re­al­ized its po­ten­tial. Wow, Adobe…here’s a potato gun. Feel free to shoot your­selves in the foot.

  4. Buck Sommerkamp says:

    And some­where in there (to add to your list) – Adobe FINALLY made Photoshop Touch avail­able to those of us with Nexus 7 de­vices who had been very dis­ap­pointed (for many months) that Photoshop Touch was not avail­able for this sparkling new tablet. Now that it works on the Nexus 7, it seems that my hope for other Touch apps has been dashed by this sud­den dis­con­tin­u­ance and (as usual) ter­ri­ble com­mu­ni­ca­tion from Adobe. It’s like the mid­night vote on the fis­cal cliff — way to qui­etly an­nounce some­thing over the hol­i­days. I’m glad I never re­ally trusted Proto; it looked so promis­ing but never re­al­ized its po­ten­tial. Wow, Adobe…here’s a potato gun. Feel free to shoot your­selves in the foot.

  5. I agree that these apps did not get a fair shake in the mar­ket­place. Many of them were not even re­leased on the iPad un­til much later than the orig­i­nal May re­lease for Creative Cloud, so how can they say that they were not vi­able? Also the $9.99 pric­etag for Proto was a bit steep. PS Touch was a great value at $9.99 but the other apps were not as hefty. Debut didn’t even make it to the iPad!

    I am sad to see that Adobe has EOL the ma­jor­ity of these prod­ucts in­stead of phas­ing out the 1-2 prod­ucts that were not needed (Kuler and Collage) and pro­moted the re­main­der (Proto/Debut) with a new price point and more ag­gres­sive mar­ket­ing. I for one loved Debut and the abil­ity to view native/raw Creative Suite doc­u­ments with­out hav­ing to con­vert to a jpg or PDF to view on my tablet.

  6. I agree that these apps did not get a fair shake in the mar­ket­place. Many of them were not even re­leased on the iPad un­til much later than the orig­i­nal May re­lease for Creative Cloud, so how can they say that they were not vi­able? Also the $9.99 pric­etag for Proto was a bit steep. PS Touch was a great value at $9.99 but the other apps were not as hefty. Debut didn’t even make it to the iPad!

    I am sad to see that Adobe has EOL the ma­jor­ity of these prod­ucts in­stead of phas­ing out the 1-2 prod­ucts that were not needed (Kuler and Collage) and pro­moted the re­main­der (Proto/Debut) with a new price point and more ag­gres­sive mar­ket­ing. I for one loved Debut and the abil­ity to view native/raw Creative Suite doc­u­ments with­out hav­ing to con­vert to a jpg or PDF to view on my tablet.

  7. Jeremy H says:

    Well said. As an Adobe UGM and a de­voted Adobe user, I am ac­tu­ally get­ting scared off by Adobe’s seem­ing lack of sta­bil­ity these last few years. There have been a lot of changes, no clear di­rec­tion and their mar­ket­ing and com­mu­ni­ca­tions in gen­eral is be­ing run as if they were a small start-up soft­ware com­pany. I am hold­ing off on im­ple­ment­ing Business Catalyst and the Creative Cloud for my com­pany be­cause I am not cer­tain that ei­ther will be there in 12 months. As a busi­ness owner, why would I in­vest in a pro­duct that I can’t be sure will be there in a few months.

  8. Jeremy H says:

    Well said. As an Adobe UGM and a de­voted Adobe user, I am ac­tu­ally get­ting scared off by Adobe’s seem­ing lack of sta­bil­ity these last few years. There have been a lot of changes, no clear di­rec­tion and their mar­ket­ing and com­mu­ni­ca­tions in gen­eral is be­ing run as if they were a small start-up soft­ware com­pany. I am hold­ing off on im­ple­ment­ing Business Catalyst and the Creative Cloud for my com­pany be­cause I am not cer­tain that ei­ther will be there in 12 months. As a busi­ness owner, why would I in­vest in a pro­duct that I can’t be sure will be there in a few months.

  9. Interesting per­spec­tive, Jeremy.

  10. Interesting per­spec­tive, Jeremy.

  11. Worajedt Sitthidumrong says:

    Thank you for your valu­able opin­ion and for every com­ments here also.
    I’s one of the Adobe UGM and know how hard to do the same tasks as Pariah with many app an­nounce­ment like this.

    Jeremy’s opin­ion is very in­ter­est­ing. I’m feel­ing in the same boat. Many time I feel like Adobe Product up­grade isn’t worth over­all. Photoshop may be good. But look at what hap­pen with Flash Catalyst and how much fea­ture up­grade for Flash Pro, and don’t event have to men­tion about Dreamweaver that can’t catch up with the world that changed to web frame­work. Most of the top web de­signer never use DW any more. Sublime TextEditor or IDE + good frame­work (that adobe didn’t sup­port like Bootstrap, Less, Retina Web Support etc..)

    And Proto, one of the app I use fre­quently event it’s not the best. EOL now..

  12. Worajedt Sitthidumrong says:

    Thank you for your valu­able opin­ion and for every com­ments here also.
    I’s one of the Adobe UGM and know how hard to do the same tasks as Pariah with many app an­nounce­ment like this.

    Jeremy’s opin­ion is very in­ter­est­ing. I’m feel­ing in the same boat. Many time I feel like Adobe Product up­grade isn’t worth over­all. Photoshop may be good. But look at what hap­pen with Flash Catalyst and how much fea­ture up­grade for Flash Pro, and don’t event have to men­tion about Dreamweaver that can’t catch up with the world that changed to web frame­work. Most of the top web de­signer never use DW any more. Sublime TextEditor or IDE + good frame­work (that adobe didn’t sup­port like Bootstrap, Less, Retina Web Support etc..)

    And Proto, one of the app I use fre­quently event it’s not the best. EOL now..

  13. Anthony Sherritt says:

    This is pure BULL SH%T! Why do they keep do­ing this to their com­mu­nity?! I showed every­one in the of­fice Proto and Collage. They were all ex­cited about it. Now, once again like af­ter Flash Catalyst got pulled, I look and feel like a mo­ron. I love Adobe prod­ucts. I pay for them. It is how I make my liv­ing, but now you are re­ally screw­ing with me. Whats next?! You are a huge com­pany. If Steve Jobs could com­mu­ni­cate with his com­mu­nity, why not you?! I’m sick of this. Where can I com­plain?

  14. Anthony Sherritt says:

    This is pure BULL SH%T! Why do they keep do­ing this to their com­mu­nity?! I showed every­one in the of­fice Proto and Collage. They were all ex­cited about it. Now, once again like af­ter Flash Catalyst got pulled, I look and feel like a mo­ron. I love Adobe prod­ucts. I pay for them. It is how I make my liv­ing, but now you are re­ally screw­ing with me. Whats next?! You are a huge com­pany. If Steve Jobs could com­mu­ni­cate with his com­mu­nity, why not you?! I’m sick of this. Where can I com­plain?

  15. And where does this leave those of us who made the in­vest­ment on faith that the re­la­tion­ship be­tween de­vices would grow?

  16. And where does this leave those of us who made the in­vest­ment on faith that the re­la­tion­ship be­tween de­vices would grow?

  17. A col­league of mine summed up this sit­u­a­tion by point­ing out that Adobe has val­i­dated it’s crit­ics as­ser­tion that Adobe doesn’t com­mit to any­thing, that Adobe “dabbles,”–it dab­bles in ser­vices, it dab­bles in mo­bile, it dab­bles in dif­fer­ent things with­out com­mit­ting to them–and that se­ri­ous busi­nesses need to be very wary about align­ing them­selves with Adobe’s dab­bles.

  18. A col­league of mine summed up this sit­u­a­tion by point­ing out that Adobe has val­i­dated it’s crit­ics as­ser­tion that Adobe doesn’t com­mit to any­thing, that Adobe “dabbles,”–it dab­bles in ser­vices, it dab­bles in mo­bile, it dab­bles in dif­fer­ent things with­out com­mit­ting to them–and that se­ri­ous busi­nesses need to be very wary about align­ing them­selves with Adobe’s dab­bles.

  19. Hey every­one,

    Interesting news.

    I would like to hear more from Adobe as to their rea­sons for dis­con­tin­u­ing some of the touch apps. I am not sure if there is more to the blog post about the EOL an­nounce­ment but it seemed un­in­for­ma­tive at best. 

    Pariah, you are cor­rect that it takes time to ma­ture a good ap­pli­ca­tion in de­vel­op­ment and pro­mo­tion and that too many apps to fo­cus on can and will throw off de­vel­op­ment on per­fect­ing the few apps that we should give at­ten­tion to. I feel that you could merge the func­tion­al­ity of sev­eral of the apps into one like make Kuler an in­te­gral part of Adobe Proto and/or Photoshop Touch & Adobe Ideas. Or make the func­tion­al­ity of Adobe Ideas in­te­grate with Photoshop Touch. 

    I feel that the func­tion­al­ity of what should be one or two apps have been seg­mented into many for the pur­poses of more in­come for the com­pany but at the sac­ri­fice of cre­ative flex­i­bil­ity of the user.

    I agree that the touch apps should be rethought in­stead of given the EOL sta­tus. Now I am cu­ri­ous as to other re­sponses to this an­nounce­ment.

  20. Hey every­one,

    Interesting news.

    I would like to hear more from Adobe as to their rea­sons for dis­con­tin­u­ing some of the touch apps. I am not sure if there is more to the blog post about the EOL an­nounce­ment but it seemed un­in­for­ma­tive at best. 

    Pariah, you are cor­rect that it takes time to ma­ture a good ap­pli­ca­tion in de­vel­op­ment and pro­mo­tion and that too many apps to fo­cus on can and will throw off de­vel­op­ment on per­fect­ing the few apps that we should give at­ten­tion to. I feel that you could merge the func­tion­al­ity of sev­eral of the apps into one like make Kuler an in­te­gral part of Adobe Proto and/or Photoshop Touch & Adobe Ideas. Or make the func­tion­al­ity of Adobe Ideas in­te­grate with Photoshop Touch. 

    I feel that the func­tion­al­ity of what should be one or two apps have been seg­mented into many for the pur­poses of more in­come for the com­pany but at the sac­ri­fice of cre­ative flex­i­bil­ity of the user.

    I agree that the touch apps should be rethought in­stead of given the EOL sta­tus. Now I am cu­ri­ous as to other re­sponses to this an­nounce­ment.

  21. Sally Cox says:

    I whole­heart­edly agree with Pariah on this is­sue. As a trainer and ACP, I have tire­lessly pro­moted these tools from Day One. I ad ac­cess to them and the Touch Tools team long be­fore their re­lease. I de­vel­oped a video train­ing se­ries on them and worked to cre­ate work­flows that made sense for de­sign­ers. I de­moed Proto for Bay Area Mobile shortly af­ter the re­lease, and maybe peo­ple pur­chased it that evening. Now, with no no­tice, these tools are be­ing dis­con­tin­ued and we are left to an­swer our clients’ ques­tions.

    Adobe has a long-standing rep­u­ta­tion for lis­ten­ing to cus­tomers and that seems to have been aban­doned in re­cent years. Clearly, no lessons were learned from the de­ba­cle of last year. I plead with you, Adobe, don’t aban­don tools that i urged so many peo­ple to pay $9.99 for less than a year ago. This un­der­mi­nes my au­thor­ity and cre­ates yet an­other dis­con­nect with the com­mu­nity who so cher­ish your prod­ucts.

    It is widely as­sumed apps you pur­chase in the App Store will con­tinue to be sup­ported, and not aban­doned less than a year af­ter their re­lease. All the work I have done to pro­mote them, my video train­ing, all of it is garbage now. That is very dis­heart­en­ing, in­deed.

  22. Sally Cox says:

    I whole­heart­edly agree with Pariah on this is­sue. As a trainer and ACP, I have tire­lessly pro­moted these tools from Day One. I ad ac­cess to them and the Touch Tools team long be­fore their re­lease. I de­vel­oped a video train­ing se­ries on them and worked to cre­ate work­flows that made sense for de­sign­ers. I de­moed Proto for Bay Area Mobile shortly af­ter the re­lease, and maybe peo­ple pur­chased it that evening. Now, with no no­tice, these tools are be­ing dis­con­tin­ued and we are left to an­swer our clients’ ques­tions.

    Adobe has a long-standing rep­u­ta­tion for lis­ten­ing to cus­tomers and that seems to have been aban­doned in re­cent years. Clearly, no lessons were learned from the de­ba­cle of last year. I plead with you, Adobe, don’t aban­don tools that i urged so many peo­ple to pay $9.99 for less than a year ago. This un­der­mi­nes my au­thor­ity and cre­ates yet an­other dis­con­nect with the com­mu­nity who so cher­ish your prod­ucts.

    It is widely as­sumed apps you pur­chase in the App Store will con­tinue to be sup­ported, and not aban­doned less than a year af­ter their re­lease. All the work I have done to pro­mote them, my video train­ing, all of it is garbage now. That is very dis­heart­en­ing, in­deed.

  23. @Stephen Interesting per­spec­tive there, that maybe the Touch Apps should have been fewer in num­ber but in­di­vid­u­ally more ca­pa­ble. I can cer­tainly see that po­si­tion.

    Either way, there is… was… a tremen­dous po­ten­tial in the Touch Apps that went un­re­al­ized. They were too early in de­vel­op­ment. I bought mine–out of pocket, no reimbursement–because I saw their value in­creas­ing with later re­leases. I saw them get­ting more ca­pa­ble in­di­vid­u­ally as well as of­fer­ing tighter in­te­gra­tion with each and the desk­top applications–that IS the whole point of Creative Cloud Connection. I think many others–both those that al­ready ob­tained the apps as well as those watch­ing the Touch Apps’ futures–felt the same way. The po­ten­tial was aborted too early.

    The man­ner of the abor­tion was de­cid­edly un-Adobe-like… At least, it’s not like the Adobe that was prior to the last 2 years. Maybe this is just an­other sign that Adobe has in­deed changed.

  24. @Stephen Interesting per­spec­tive there, that maybe the Touch Apps should have been fewer in num­ber but in­di­vid­u­ally more ca­pa­ble. I can cer­tainly see that po­si­tion.

    Either way, there is… was… a tremen­dous po­ten­tial in the Touch Apps that went un­re­al­ized. They were too early in de­vel­op­ment. I bought mine–out of pocket, no reimbursement–because I saw their value in­creas­ing with later re­leases. I saw them get­ting more ca­pa­ble in­di­vid­u­ally as well as of­fer­ing tighter in­te­gra­tion with each and the desk­top applications–that IS the whole point of Creative Cloud Connection. I think many others–both those that al­ready ob­tained the apps as well as those watch­ing the Touch Apps’ futures–felt the same way. The po­ten­tial was aborted too early.

    The man­ner of the abor­tion was de­cid­edly un-Adobe-like… At least, it’s not like the Adobe that was prior to the last 2 years. Maybe this is just an­other sign that Adobe has in­deed changed.

  25. Anthony Sherritt says:

    I see the model Adobe is go­ing for like with the Edge prod­ucts. Test new prod­ucts in small re­leases, per­fect them, then fold them in to a larger pro­duct. Great. But they aren’t charg­ing $10 a piece for those. And how can they yank func­tion­al­ity with­out pro­vid­ing a re­place­ment? So Proto wasn’t right? Fine. It’s al­ready built. Continue to sup­port it, let it out for free if need be, while you fig­ure out how to put it into a Dreamweaver touch app, etc. That short para­graph which amounted to “We’ve de­cided to go a dif­fer­ent way,” was a real be­trayal and slap in the face. What way could they pos­si­bly be go­ing next?

  26. Anthony Sherritt says:

    I see the model Adobe is go­ing for like with the Edge prod­ucts. Test new prod­ucts in small re­leases, per­fect them, then fold them in to a larger pro­duct. Great. But they aren’t charg­ing $10 a piece for those. And how can they yank func­tion­al­ity with­out pro­vid­ing a re­place­ment? So Proto wasn’t right? Fine. It’s al­ready built. Continue to sup­port it, let it out for free if need be, while you fig­ure out how to put it into a Dreamweaver touch app, etc. That short para­graph which amounted to “We’ve de­cided to go a dif­fer­ent way,” was a real be­trayal and slap in the face. What way could they pos­si­bly be go­ing next?

  27. Thank you Pariah for the re­sponse. I have a feel­ing that Adobe should start see­ing apps as a more so­phis­ti­cated tool in­stead of just mini ap­pli­ca­tions. Adobe has the abil­ity to change the mean­ing and ap­pli­ca­tion of touch apps by get­ting them pretty close to the func­tion­al­ity of Photoshop, Illustrator, Flash and Dreamweaver from a touch per­spec­tive. That is what I would like to see hap­pen. In ad­di­tion keep the price low un­der $9.99 or if pos­si­ble as was put “make them free”. With this be­ing a solid de­ci­sion by Adobe I sus­pect that they have a myr­iad of rea­sons that has yet to be shared. It would be good to share them and get thoughts or so­lu­tions from the com­mu­nity.

  28. Thank you Pariah for the re­sponse. I have a feel­ing that Adobe should start see­ing apps as a more so­phis­ti­cated tool in­stead of just mini ap­pli­ca­tions. Adobe has the abil­ity to change the mean­ing and ap­pli­ca­tion of touch apps by get­ting them pretty close to the func­tion­al­ity of Photoshop, Illustrator, Flash and Dreamweaver from a touch per­spec­tive. That is what I would like to see hap­pen. In ad­di­tion keep the price low un­der $9.99 or if pos­si­ble as was put “make them free”. With this be­ing a solid de­ci­sion by Adobe I sus­pect that they have a myr­iad of rea­sons that has yet to be shared. It would be good to share them and get thoughts or so­lu­tions from the com­mu­nity.

  29. Hi Pariah,

    Just to let you & the com­mu­nity know, there was a tech­ni­cal glitch on the Creative Cloud blog that sent all the sub­mit­ted com­ments straight to a spam folder. This has been fixed and the sub­mit­ted com­ments are now live on the site. Apologies for the is­sue and we do ap­pre­ci­ate the feed­back.

    -Rachel

  30. Hi Pariah,

    Just to let you & the com­mu­nity know, there was a tech­ni­cal glitch on the Creative Cloud blog that sent all the sub­mit­ted com­ments straight to a spam folder. This has been fixed and the sub­mit­ted com­ments are now live on the site. Apologies for the is­sue and we do ap­pre­ci­ate the feed­back.

    -Rachel

  31. Hi, Rachel.

    Excellent! Thank you for mak­ing sure that hap­pened and for let­ting us know all those pend­ing com­ments have been pub­lished.

  32. Hi, Rachel.

    Excellent! Thank you for mak­ing sure that hap­pened and for let­ting us know all those pend­ing com­ments have been pub­lished.

  33. Earlier to­day Adobe up­dated Jill’s post. I don’t feel the up­date was wise. My rea­son is ex­plained in the com­ment I sub­mit­ted on Jill’s post; it hasn’t shown up yet on Jill’s post, so I’ll reprint it here:

    Thank you for the up­date, Jill, though it doesn’t re­ally say any­thing among all those words. I re­ally hope that isn’t the fi­nal, of­fi­cial word on the sub­ject.

    You didn’t ad­dress the main is­sue of the dam­age the de­ci­sion and method of EOL does to Adobe’s cred­i­bil­ity. In fact, the up­date ex­ac­er­bates the sit­u­a­tion by be­ing un­apolo­getic and im­ply­ing Adobe would end of life fu­ture apps in the same man­ner if these apps, re­gard­less of cus­tomer opin­ions, aren’t liv­ing up to an ar­bi­trary in­ter­nal stan­dard you don’t ap­par­ently see fit to re­veal.

  34. Earlier to­day Adobe up­dated Jill’s post. I don’t feel the up­date was wise. My rea­son is ex­plained in the com­ment I sub­mit­ted on Jill’s post; it hasn’t shown up yet on Jill’s post, so I’ll reprint it here:

    Thank you for the up­date, Jill, though it doesn’t re­ally say any­thing among all those words. I re­ally hope that isn’t the fi­nal, of­fi­cial word on the sub­ject.

    You didn’t ad­dress the main is­sue of the dam­age the de­ci­sion and method of EOL does to Adobe’s cred­i­bil­ity. In fact, the up­date ex­ac­er­bates the sit­u­a­tion by be­ing un­apolo­getic and im­ply­ing Adobe would end of life fu­ture apps in the same man­ner if these apps, re­gard­less of cus­tomer opin­ions, aren’t liv­ing up to an ar­bi­trary in­ter­nal stan­dard you don’t ap­par­ently see fit to re­veal.

  35. I’m sur­prised to hear you say this sort of be­hav­ior is a re­cent change at Adobe, al­though I’ll agree it’s got­ten much worse lately. I left Adobe in early 2007, af­ter six years with Macromedia, be­cause of their in­ter­nal bu­reau­cracy and “consensus-driven” ap­proach to do­ing any­thing. Adobe is so risk averse that it con­tin­u­ally chops and changes its pro­duct lineup at the first sign of “fail­ure” and has been clue­less about the vi­a­bil­ity and pric­ing of prod­ucts for years, cer­tainly dat­ing back to when I still worked there. Part of their stated rea­son for buy­ing Macromedia was to im­prove how they worked with their com­mu­nity, by learn­ing from Macromedia, but that ef­fort seems to have been com­pletely aban­doned over the last half decade and they seem to con­stantly shoot their com­mu­nity in the foot with lack of com­mu­ni­ca­tion and bizarre / ran­dom pro­duct di­rec­tion changes. Last year I re­al­ized I no longer used any Adobe soft­ware – I’d switched to cheaper and/or bet­ter al­ter­na­tives for every­thing. It felt very strange unin­stalling Creative Suite and all their stand­alone soft­ware af­ter it had been such a sta­ple in my daily work­flow for so many years pre­vi­ous. Strange, but also very lib­er­at­ing. I cer­tainly wouldn’t bet my busi­ness or my rep­u­ta­tion on Adobe these days…

  36. I’m sur­prised to hear you say this sort of be­hav­ior is a re­cent change at Adobe, al­though I’ll agree it’s got­ten much worse lately. I left Adobe in early 2007, af­ter six years with Macromedia, be­cause of their in­ter­nal bu­reau­cracy and “consensus-driven” ap­proach to do­ing any­thing. Adobe is so risk averse that it con­tin­u­ally chops and changes its pro­duct lineup at the first sign of “fail­ure” and has been clue­less about the vi­a­bil­ity and pric­ing of prod­ucts for years, cer­tainly dat­ing back to when I still worked there. Part of their stated rea­son for buy­ing Macromedia was to im­prove how they worked with their com­mu­nity, by learn­ing from Macromedia, but that ef­fort seems to have been com­pletely aban­doned over the last half decade and they seem to con­stantly shoot their com­mu­nity in the foot with lack of com­mu­ni­ca­tion and bizarre / ran­dom pro­duct di­rec­tion changes. Last year I re­al­ized I no longer used any Adobe soft­ware – I’d switched to cheaper and/or bet­ter al­ter­na­tives for every­thing. It felt very strange unin­stalling Creative Suite and all their stand­alone soft­ware af­ter it had been such a sta­ple in my daily work­flow for so many years pre­vi­ous. Strange, but also very lib­er­at­ing. I cer­tainly wouldn’t bet my busi­ness or my rep­u­ta­tion on Adobe these days…

  37. I agree with Steve Burns that Adobe needs to see apps as so­phis­ti­cated tools rather than mini apps.

    For some decades now (I go back to PS v.1.0) I’ve felt that Adobe has suf­fered from “larges­sos­ity.” If a com­pet­ing pro­duct looks like it’s ac­tu­ally mak­ing some real money, Adobe just tries to buy it out to get it off the mar­ket or if un­able to do so, just bring in some soft­ware geeks and add the com­pet­ing fea­tures to its ex­ist­ing prod­ucts. If a small pro­to­type pro­duct isn’t a re­ally super-big win right out the gate, it seems that bottom-line-watching man­agers feel that some VP up­stairs is hun­gry to ex­er­cise his or her power and so the man­agers fear los­ing their jobs and be­come all too will­ing to throw the fledg­ling pro­duct un­der the bus. And, frankly, things like apps are just “lite” for truly se­ri­ous macro-thinking pro­duct man­agers and VPs whose life work is to “climb to the top.” It seems that Steve’s use of the no­tion of an app be­ing a “so­phis­ti­cated tool” might well be a tag that will al­low Adobe man­age­ment to see apps in a more prof­itable light.

  38. I agree with Steve Burns that Adobe needs to see apps as so­phis­ti­cated tools rather than mini apps.

    For some decades now (I go back to PS v.1.0) I’ve felt that Adobe has suf­fered from “larges­sos­ity.” If a com­pet­ing pro­duct looks like it’s ac­tu­ally mak­ing some real money, Adobe just tries to buy it out to get it off the mar­ket or if un­able to do so, just bring in some soft­ware geeks and add the com­pet­ing fea­tures to its ex­ist­ing prod­ucts. If a small pro­to­type pro­duct isn’t a re­ally super-big win right out the gate, it seems that bottom-line-watching man­agers feel that some VP up­stairs is hun­gry to ex­er­cise his or her power and so the man­agers fear los­ing their jobs and be­come all too will­ing to throw the fledg­ling pro­duct un­der the bus. And, frankly, things like apps are just “lite” for truly se­ri­ous macro-thinking pro­duct man­agers and VPs whose life work is to “climb to the top.” It seems that Steve’s use of the no­tion of an app be­ing a “so­phis­ti­cated tool” might well be a tag that will al­low Adobe man­age­ment to see apps in a more prof­itable light.

  39. Albert Peña says:

    @Pariah. Thank you for post­ing on the Linkedin Adobe Illustrator Group. I read through a ma­jor­ity of all the re­sponses. Agree with a mul­ti­tude of you on here. Using Adobe prod­ucts since 1996? I be­lieve? and since that day ONE of my first Photoshop class at the Art Institute of Dallas.
    I have no­ticed how Adobe reck­lessly changes soft­ware like NOBODY ever pays at­ten­tion. So my hope is that this and other dis­cus­sions and re­sponses are fruit­ful. Look for­ward to read­ing more and see what tran­spires on this par­tic­u­lar topic. THANKS AGAIN! Pariah for your post­ing. Regards!

  40. Albert Peña says:

    @Pariah. Thank you for post­ing on the Linkedin Adobe Illustrator Group. I read through a ma­jor­ity of all the re­sponses. Agree with a mul­ti­tude of you on here. Using Adobe prod­ucts since 1996? I be­lieve? and since that day ONE of my first Photoshop class at the Art Institute of Dallas.
    I have no­ticed how Adobe reck­lessly changes soft­ware like NOBODY ever pays at­ten­tion. So my hope is that this and other dis­cus­sions and re­sponses are fruit­ful. Look for­ward to read­ing more and see what tran­spires on this par­tic­u­lar topic. THANKS AGAIN! Pariah for your post­ing. Regards!

  41. I just got off a call with some peo­ple at Adobe, in­clud­ing Jill Soley, the au­thor of the orig­i­nal Touch Apps EOL blog post. There’s noth­ing con­crete to re­port yet, but a lot of poeo­ple within Adobe are do­ing quite a lot of talk­ing and brain­storm­ing to­ward fig­ur­ing out ways to avoid sna­fus like this in the fu­ture.

  42. I just got off a call with some peo­ple at Adobe, in­clud­ing Jill Soley, the au­thor of the orig­i­nal Touch Apps EOL blog post. There’s noth­ing con­crete to re­port yet, but a lot of poeo­ple within Adobe are do­ing quite a lot of talk­ing and brain­storm­ing to­ward fig­ur­ing out ways to avoid sna­fus like this in the fu­ture.

  43. HI Pariah,

    Thank you for tak­ing the time to write this open let­ter, I will make sure to add the #AdobeTouch hash­tag when I share your post, as it cer­tainly sums up my own feel­ings on the un­timely demise of Adobe Touch apps.

    It was cer­tainly a shock to lose such promis­ing apps, es­pe­cially af­ter in­te­grat­ing them into my work­flow. Funnily enough I found Collage (the least morned) the most use­ful app of the lot as it provide a quick way to build a mood board while work­ing on de­sign con­cepts.

    One thing that I think may have been over­looked in this dis­cus­sion is the ar­rival of Windows 8, which brings the touch ex­pe­ri­ence to the desk­top, lap­top and tablet form fac­tors. CES 2013 has brought with it a raft of new de­vices which are far more pow­er­ful than an iPad or Android from a Creative pro­fes­sion­als stand­point as they are ca­pa­ble of run­ning full the full blow CS apps. 

    Most of these new Windows “Tablet” de­vices come with a highly ac­cu­rate sty­lus as well which negates the need for pur­pose built touch apps such as PS Touch. I know if I had the choice be­tween a cut­down ver­sion of Photoshop or the real deal in a sim­i­lar form fac­tor with the ac­cu­racy and pres­sure sen­si­tiv­ity of a sty­lus, I would choose the later. 

    So with the above in mind I think it’s only a mat­ter of time be­fore most of us get tired of car­ry­ing around mul­ti­ple de­vices and pay­ing for apps that only provide a small frac­tion of the cre­ative op­tions that a desk­top class ap­pli­ca­tion pro­vides.

    Still, I liked the sim­plic­ity of a the Adobe Touch apps, and they will be sorely missed from my work­flow.

    Cheers, sf d-)=

  44. HI Pariah,

    Thank you for tak­ing the time to write this open let­ter, I will make sure to add the #AdobeTouch hash­tag when I share your post, as it cer­tainly sums up my own feel­ings on the un­timely demise of Adobe Touch apps.

    It was cer­tainly a shock to lose such promis­ing apps, es­pe­cially af­ter in­te­grat­ing them into my work­flow. Funnily enough I found Collage (the least morned) the most use­ful app of the lot as it provide a quick way to build a mood board while work­ing on de­sign con­cepts.

    One thing that I think may have been over­looked in this dis­cus­sion is the ar­rival of Windows 8, which brings the touch ex­pe­ri­ence to the desk­top, lap­top and tablet form fac­tors. CES 2013 has brought with it a raft of new de­vices which are far more pow­er­ful than an iPad or Android from a Creative pro­fes­sion­als stand­point as they are ca­pa­ble of run­ning full the full blow CS apps. 

    Most of these new Windows “Tablet” de­vices come with a highly ac­cu­rate sty­lus as well which negates the need for pur­pose built touch apps such as PS Touch. I know if I had the choice be­tween a cut­down ver­sion of Photoshop or the real deal in a sim­i­lar form fac­tor with the ac­cu­racy and pres­sure sen­si­tiv­ity of a sty­lus, I would choose the later. 

    So with the above in mind I think it’s only a mat­ter of time be­fore most of us get tired of car­ry­ing around mul­ti­ple de­vices and pay­ing for apps that only provide a small frac­tion of the cre­ative op­tions that a desk­top class ap­pli­ca­tion pro­vides.

    Still, I liked the sim­plic­ity of a the Adobe Touch apps, and they will be sorely missed from my work­flow.

    Cheers, sf d-)=

  45. Looking for re­place­ment tablet apps? I wrote a piece on CreativePro​.com pro­vid­ing re­place­ments for Adobe Touch Apps. http://​www​.cre​ative​pro​.com/​a​r​t​i​c​l​e​/​r​e​p​l​a​c​i​n​g​-​a​d​o​b​e​-​t​o​u​c​h​-​a​pps

    Many cre­ative pros’ work­flows are dis­rupted by the dis­con­tin­u­a­tion of Adobe’s Touch Apps—other cre­atives never even got to try them. Pariah Burke found the apps you need to re­place Adobe Touch Apps on your iPad, iPhone, and Android tablets and phones.

  46. Looking for re­place­ment tablet apps? I wrote a piece on CreativePro​.com pro­vid­ing re­place­ments for Adobe Touch Apps. http://​www​.cre​ative​pro​.com/​a​r​t​i​c​l​e​/​r​e​p​l​a​c​i​n​g​-​a​d​o​b​e​-​t​o​u​c​h​-​a​pps

    Many cre­ative pros’ work­flows are dis­rupted by the dis­con­tin­u­a­tion of Adobe’s Touch Apps—other cre­atives never even got to try them. Pariah Burke found the apps you need to re­place Adobe Touch Apps on your iPad, iPhone, and Android tablets and phones.

  47. T. A Brunemeyer says:

    I do flags, I do ban­ners, I do signs. Little ol’ men and women come in and want flags ban­ners and signs. The have no idea what a PC is let alone vec­tor or raster art. I am not an artist or I don’t call my­self one but it’s nice when I can whip out my iPad take a snap and build a new piece for my cus­tomer. Now I am not their yet I can get around in Illustrator and inkscape but when I found ideas the other day I thought to my­self ‘this is gonna be good’ now I see that though ideas isn’t gone (yet?) sup­port and hype for the touch apps is wan­ing (or thats the im­pres­sion Im get­ting).
    Personally I say push this stuff. A Ps that’s so sim­ple my fa­ther can use it but has enough depth for power users. Ideas, think about it, so sim­ple a kinder­gartener can use it that pro­duces pieces that can be used for any size or me­dia out there. As to the rest of em. I haven’t played with em yet but I want Kuler on my iPad. I need to have color match­ing (PMS please)otherwise it’s all guess work and hav­ing some cus­tomer say “I didn’t want that blue, I wanted THAT blue” re­ally bites.

  48. T. A Brunemeyer says:

    I do flags, I do ban­ners, I do signs. Little ol’ men and women come in and want flags ban­ners and signs. The have no idea what a PC is let alone vec­tor or raster art. I am not an artist or I don’t call my­self one but it’s nice when I can whip out my iPad take a snap and build a new piece for my cus­tomer. Now I am not their yet I can get around in Illustrator and inkscape but when I found ideas the other day I thought to my­self ‘this is gonna be good’ now I see that though ideas isn’t gone (yet?) sup­port and hype for the touch apps is wan­ing (or thats the im­pres­sion Im get­ting).
    Personally I say push this stuff. A Ps that’s so sim­ple my fa­ther can use it but has enough depth for power users. Ideas, think about it, so sim­ple a kinder­gartener can use it that pro­duces pieces that can be used for any size or me­dia out there. As to the rest of em. I haven’t played with em yet but I want Kuler on my iPad. I need to have color match­ing (PMS please)otherwise it’s all guess work and hav­ing some cus­tomer say “I didn’t want that blue, I wanted THAT blue” re­ally bites.