An Open Letter to Adobe About the Premature End of Adobe Touch Apps

2012-12-20-RIP-Adobe-Touch-Apps

On December 20th, 2012 Adobe qui­etly announced via a blog post that it is dis­con­tin­u­ing sev­eral of the Adobe Touch apps. Those who missed the blog post may also have noticed that the touch apps sud­denly dis­ap­peared from the Creative Cloud dashboard.

Here’s what Jill Soley, Adobe Creative Cloud Team, wrote:

Over the past year, we’ve been explor­ing how the cre­ative process can be aug­mented and enhanced on touch devices. While some of our efforts have been suc­cess­ful, oth­ers have been less so. Therefore, start­ing today, we will no longer be updat­ing Adobe Debut, Adobe Collage, Adobe Proto, or the Android ver­sions of Adobe Ideas and Adobe Kuler.

Here’s my open let­ter to Adobe about that announce­ment. Please feel free to express your opin­ion as well.

-

Dear Adobe:

I just saw the post on the Creative Cloud Team Blog about can­celling most of the Adobe Touch apps. There are sev­eral dis­cus­sions spring­ing up about the deci­sion on Google+, Facebook, and else­where. The gen­eral feel­ing is that you made the deci­sion too soon, with many peo­ple chalk­ing it up to what appears over the last year as Adobe’s increas­ing break­down of inter­nal com­mu­ni­ca­tions between depart­ments, prod­uct teams, and pro­gram managers—but that’s another dis­cus­sion for another day.

Focusing on the Touch Apps dis­con­tin­u­ance, I think the deci­sion is pre­ma­ture. Granted, I don’t know what your sales num­bers are for the Touch apps, what new direc­tions you may be pur­su­ing, but some of those apps are younger than 7 months. How can you expect to see prod­ucts suc­ceed or fail in only 7 months or even in 18 months? Tablets and tablet soft­ware are still young and very much in a state of flux. We only this year moved into the “HD” range of tablets.

Adobe’s mar­ket­ing of the Touch apps was over­shad­owed by the focus on Creative Cloud and marred by the whole con­fu­sion of hav­ing to buy the Touch Apps from Apple and then seek a Creative Cloud sub­scrip­tion credit. How could the mar­ket even keep up with every­thing new out there? Since May 2012 Adobe and pro­gram part­ners (like me) have been pro­mot­ing all of the fol­low­ing at the same time.

  • 13 full prod­uct updates to CS6
  • Adobe Muse going 1.0
  • Acrobat XI launch
  • A move to 12-month full prod­uct release cycles
  • The Creative Cloud launch
  • Later the Creative Cloud for Teams launch
  • Creative Cloud Connection “com­ing soon”
  • Creative Cloud Connection arriving
  • Edge Tools
  • Adobe mov­ing into the game devel­op­ment arena
  • The CS6 focus on HTML5
  • The launch of Elearning Suite and update of its con­stituent products
  • The launch of the Digital Publishing Suite
  • Story Plus
  • Digital Publishing Suite Single Edition going free to publish
  • Typekit roll-out
  • Lightroom 4 release
  • Lightroom being added to the Creative Cloud
  • The announce­ment that Creative Cloud mem­bers get new fea­tures every 3-months
  • New fea­tures in Illustrator CS6 for Cloud subscribers
  • New fea­tures in InDesign CS6 for Cloud subscribers
  • New fea­tures in Photoshop CS6 for Cloud subscribers

And then, some­where amidst all that, is also…

  • New Adobe Proto
  • New Adobe Debut
  • New Adobe Collage
  • New Adobe Kuler for Android
  • Update to Adobe Ideas
  • Update to Photoshop Touch

Is it any sur­prise cus­tomers haven’t adopted all the Touch apps? They don’t know about all them because they can’t keep up with all the announce­ments and pro­mo­tion. It’s tough for me to do so and I’m an Adobe part­ner with early access to the infor­ma­tion and then a job wherein I need to know every new app and appli­ca­tion, every new fea­ture, and then fig­ure out how these can best ben­e­fit real-world cre­ative and pro­duc­tion work­flows. How can you expect design­ers work­ing 40–80 hours a week to keep up with all the new prod­ucts and announce­ments from Adobe over the last 7 months? Cut them—and your apps—some slack.

Give the Touch Apps more time.

And stop charg­ing $9.99 for them. Give them away for a cou­ple of years to gain trac­tion. If you like, leave the in-app pur­chase upgrades like extra lay­ers in Adobe Ideas, but make Adobe Ideas app itself free. Make them all free.

These apps can have both short- and long-term pos­i­tive impact for Adobe.

In the short term, they inte­grate with full appli­ca­tions in ways most peo­ple don’t know about—for instance, almost no one knows Proto designs can be opened on the desk­top in Dreamweaver, com­plete with all the JavaScript, CSS, and other assets required to repro­duce the entire Proto site sketch in a real site instantly pub­lish­able from Dreamweaver. The inte­gra­tion with the desk­top apps is what will make these sell, and they, in turn, will help sell your desk­top prod­ucts. Competing mobile apps can’t match that inte­gra­tion, so once the pub­lic learns about it, Adobe Touch apps will have greater value and dom­i­nate the mobile cre­ative space the way Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, Flash, Dreamweaver, and all the rest already dom­i­nate the desk­top cre­ative space.

In the long-term, they pro­vide two valu­able things: First, they keep an Adobe pres­ence on the next com­put­ing plat­form. Second, they prove that Adobe under­stands Mobile, which is impor­tant because Adobe was 10 years late to under­stand­ing the Web and 3 years late to get­ting it’s head into the whole smart­phone move­ment. After 10 years Adobe still doesn’t get ebooks (EPUB, MOBI, KF8, etc.), and the mar­ket knows that. You need the tablet pres­ence these apps give you.

In fact, I think you need to expand the num­ber of plat­forms. Find some way to make these apps work on the cus­tomized Android 2.x plat­forms like the Kindle Fire line and NOOK Tablet line. Drop the price of the Touch apps from $9.99 to free, then use them as an egress into Creative Cloud. Let peo­ple see in each app not just their Creative Cloud-stored files but the desk­top apps they could get with a Creative Cloud sub­scrip­tion. Let them sub­scribe directly within the Touch apps’ UIs.

At least, that’s my two cents.

Regards,

Pariah Burke
http://​iamPariah​.com@iamPariahhttp://​about​.me/​p​a​r​i​a​h​burke

Now in the Eastern timezone!

Consulting & Training: ePub­lish­ing, Digital Publishing, Creative Workflows, Creative Software

Informing & Empowering Creative Professionals.™

-

Update 2013-01-02: Comments on Jill’s post are appar­ently dis­abled as there are none, and I know I sub­mit­ted one on December 20th.

Update: 2013-01-03: If you dis­cuss the ter­mi­na­tion (End of Life or EOL) of Adobe Touch apps in social media, please include the hash­tag #AdobeTouch (as you can see here on Twitter) . I’ve been informed that Adobe only sees dis­cus­sions with hash­tags, and that Adobe cur­rently believes no one is dis­cussing the Adobe Touch apps being ended or in such a man­ner. Make sure Adobe sees your reac­tion by includ­ing the #AdobeTouch hash­tag in your conversations.

Update 2013-01-04: Comments on Jill’s post have been restored—dozens of them. See com­ment below from Adobe rep­re­sen­ta­tive Rachel Luxemburg for the rea­son they didn’t appear until now.

Update: 2013-01-07: I just got off a call with some peo­ple at Adobe, includ­ing Jill Soley, the author of the orig­i­nal Touch Apps EOL blog post. There’s noth­ing con­crete to report yet, but a lot of peo­ple within Adobe are doing quite a lot of talk­ing and brain­storm­ing toward fig­ur­ing out ways to avoid sna­fus like this in the future.

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25 Responses

  1. Fireboy says:

    Let them sub­scribe directly within the Touch apps’ UIs.”

    Could you imag­ine them pay­ing 30% to Apple from a in-app pur­chase of the cre­ative cloud. NOT.

  2. Fireboy says:

    Let them sub­scribe directly within the Touch apps’ UIs.”

    Could you imag­ine them pay­ing 30% to Apple from a in-app pur­chase of the cre­ative cloud. NOT.

  3. Buck Sommerkamp says:

    And some­where in there (to add to your list) - Adobe FINALLY made Photoshop Touch avail­able to those of us with Nexus 7 devices who had been very dis­ap­pointed (for many months) that Photoshop Touch was not avail­able for this sparkling new tablet. Now that it works on the Nexus 7, it seems that my hope for other Touch apps has been dashed by this sud­den dis­con­tin­u­ance and (as usual) ter­ri­ble com­mu­ni­ca­tion from Adobe. It’s like the mid­night vote on the fis­cal cliff -- way to qui­etly announce some­thing over the hol­i­days. I’m glad I never really trusted Proto; it looked so promis­ing but never real­ized its poten­tial. Wow, Adobe…here’s a potato gun. Feel free to shoot your­selves in the foot.

  4. Buck Sommerkamp says:

    And some­where in there (to add to your list) - Adobe FINALLY made Photoshop Touch avail­able to those of us with Nexus 7 devices who had been very dis­ap­pointed (for many months) that Photoshop Touch was not avail­able for this sparkling new tablet. Now that it works on the Nexus 7, it seems that my hope for other Touch apps has been dashed by this sud­den dis­con­tin­u­ance and (as usual) ter­ri­ble com­mu­ni­ca­tion from Adobe. It’s like the mid­night vote on the fis­cal cliff -- way to qui­etly announce some­thing over the hol­i­days. I’m glad I never really trusted Proto; it looked so promis­ing but never real­ized its poten­tial. Wow, Adobe…here’s a potato gun. Feel free to shoot your­selves in the foot.

  5. I agree that these apps did not get a fair shake in the mar­ket­place. Many of them were not even released on the iPad until much later than the orig­i­nal May release for Creative Cloud, so how can they say that they were not viable? Also the $9.99 pric­etag for Proto was a bit steep. PS Touch was a great value at $9.99 but the other apps were not as hefty. Debut didn’t even make it to the iPad!

    I am sad to see that Adobe has EOL the major­ity of these prod­ucts instead of phas­ing out the 1-2 prod­ucts that were not needed (Kuler and Collage) and pro­moted the remain­der (Proto/Debut) with a new price point and more aggres­sive mar­ket­ing. I for one loved Debut and the abil­ity to view native/raw Creative Suite doc­u­ments with­out hav­ing to con­vert to a jpg or PDF to view on my tablet.

  6. I agree that these apps did not get a fair shake in the mar­ket­place. Many of them were not even released on the iPad until much later than the orig­i­nal May release for Creative Cloud, so how can they say that they were not viable? Also the $9.99 pric­etag for Proto was a bit steep. PS Touch was a great value at $9.99 but the other apps were not as hefty. Debut didn’t even make it to the iPad!

    I am sad to see that Adobe has EOL the major­ity of these prod­ucts instead of phas­ing out the 1-2 prod­ucts that were not needed (Kuler and Collage) and pro­moted the remain­der (Proto/Debut) with a new price point and more aggres­sive mar­ket­ing. I for one loved Debut and the abil­ity to view native/raw Creative Suite doc­u­ments with­out hav­ing to con­vert to a jpg or PDF to view on my tablet.

  7. Jeremy H says:

    Well said. As an Adobe UGM and a devoted Adobe user, I am actu­ally get­ting scared off by Adobe’s seem­ing lack of sta­bil­ity these last few years. There have been a lot of changes, no clear direc­tion and their mar­ket­ing and com­mu­ni­ca­tions in gen­eral is being run as if they were a small start-up soft­ware com­pany. I am hold­ing off on imple­ment­ing Business Catalyst and the Creative Cloud for my com­pany because I am not cer­tain that either will be there in 12 months. As a busi­ness owner, why would I invest in a prod­uct that I can’t be sure will be there in a few months.

  8. Jeremy H says:

    Well said. As an Adobe UGM and a devoted Adobe user, I am actu­ally get­ting scared off by Adobe’s seem­ing lack of sta­bil­ity these last few years. There have been a lot of changes, no clear direc­tion and their mar­ket­ing and com­mu­ni­ca­tions in gen­eral is being run as if they were a small start-up soft­ware com­pany. I am hold­ing off on imple­ment­ing Business Catalyst and the Creative Cloud for my com­pany because I am not cer­tain that either will be there in 12 months. As a busi­ness owner, why would I invest in a prod­uct that I can’t be sure will be there in a few months.

  9. Pariah Burke says:

    Interesting per­spec­tive, Jeremy.

  10. Pariah Burke says:

    Interesting per­spec­tive, Jeremy.

  11. Worajedt Sitthidumrong says:

    Thank you for your valu­able opin­ion and for every com­ments here also.
    I’s one of the Adobe UGM and know how hard to do the same tasks as Pariah with many app announce­ment like this.

    Jeremy’s opin­ion is very inter­est­ing. I’m feel­ing in the same boat. Many time I feel like Adobe Product upgrade isn’t worth over­all. Photoshop may be good. But look at what hap­pen with Flash Catalyst and how much fea­ture upgrade for Flash Pro, and don’t event have to men­tion about Dreamweaver that can’t catch up with the world that changed to web frame­work. Most of the top web designer never use DW any more. Sublime TextEditor or IDE + good frame­work (that adobe didn’t sup­port like Bootstrap, Less, Retina Web Support etc..)

    And Proto, one of the app I use fre­quently event it’s not the best. EOL now..

  12. Worajedt Sitthidumrong says:

    Thank you for your valu­able opin­ion and for every com­ments here also.
    I’s one of the Adobe UGM and know how hard to do the same tasks as Pariah with many app announce­ment like this.

    Jeremy’s opin­ion is very inter­est­ing. I’m feel­ing in the same boat. Many time I feel like Adobe Product upgrade isn’t worth over­all. Photoshop may be good. But look at what hap­pen with Flash Catalyst and how much fea­ture upgrade for Flash Pro, and don’t event have to men­tion about Dreamweaver that can’t catch up with the world that changed to web frame­work. Most of the top web designer never use DW any more. Sublime TextEditor or IDE + good frame­work (that adobe didn’t sup­port like Bootstrap, Less, Retina Web Support etc..)

    And Proto, one of the app I use fre­quently event it’s not the best. EOL now..

  13. Anthony Sherritt says:

    This is pure BULL SH%T! Why do they keep doing this to their com­mu­nity?! I showed every­one in the office Proto and Collage. They were all excited about it. Now, once again like after Flash Catalyst got pulled, I look and feel like a moron. I love Adobe prod­ucts. I pay for them. It is how I make my liv­ing, but now you are really screw­ing with me. Whats next?! You are a huge com­pany. If Steve Jobs could com­mu­ni­cate with his com­mu­nity, why not you?! I’m sick of this. Where can I complain?

  14. Anthony Sherritt says:

    This is pure BULL SH%T! Why do they keep doing this to their com­mu­nity?! I showed every­one in the office Proto and Collage. They were all excited about it. Now, once again like after Flash Catalyst got pulled, I look and feel like a moron. I love Adobe prod­ucts. I pay for them. It is how I make my liv­ing, but now you are really screw­ing with me. Whats next?! You are a huge com­pany. If Steve Jobs could com­mu­ni­cate with his com­mu­nity, why not you?! I’m sick of this. Where can I complain?

  15. And where does this leave those of us who made the invest­ment on faith that the rela­tion­ship between devices would grow?

  16. And where does this leave those of us who made the invest­ment on faith that the rela­tion­ship between devices would grow?

  17. Pariah Burke says:

    A col­league of mine summed up this sit­u­a­tion by point­ing out that Adobe has val­i­dated it’s crit­ics asser­tion that Adobe doesn’t com­mit to any­thing, that Adobe “dabbles,”--it dab­bles in ser­vices, it dab­bles in mobile, it dab­bles in dif­fer­ent things with­out com­mit­ting to them--and that seri­ous busi­nesses need to be very wary about align­ing them­selves with Adobe’s dabbles.

  18. Pariah Burke says:

    A col­league of mine summed up this sit­u­a­tion by point­ing out that Adobe has val­i­dated it’s crit­ics asser­tion that Adobe doesn’t com­mit to any­thing, that Adobe “dabbles,”--it dab­bles in ser­vices, it dab­bles in mobile, it dab­bles in dif­fer­ent things with­out com­mit­ting to them--and that seri­ous busi­nesses need to be very wary about align­ing them­selves with Adobe’s dabbles.

  19. Hey every­one,

    Interesting news.

    I would like to hear more from Adobe as to their rea­sons for dis­con­tin­u­ing some of the touch apps. I am not sure if there is more to the blog post about the EOL announce­ment but it seemed unin­for­ma­tive at best.

    Pariah, you are cor­rect that it takes time to mature a good appli­ca­tion in devel­op­ment and pro­mo­tion and that too many apps to focus on can and will throw off devel­op­ment on per­fect­ing the few apps that we should give atten­tion to. I feel that you could merge the func­tion­al­ity of sev­eral of the apps into one like make Kuler an inte­gral part of Adobe Proto and/or Photoshop Touch & Adobe Ideas. Or make the func­tion­al­ity of Adobe Ideas inte­grate with Photoshop Touch.

    I feel that the func­tion­al­ity of what should be one or two apps have been seg­mented into many for the pur­poses of more income for the com­pany but at the sac­ri­fice of cre­ative flex­i­bil­ity of the user.

    I agree that the touch apps should be rethought instead of given the EOL sta­tus. Now I am curi­ous as to other responses to this announcement.

  20. Hey every­one,

    Interesting news.

    I would like to hear more from Adobe as to their rea­sons for dis­con­tin­u­ing some of the touch apps. I am not sure if there is more to the blog post about the EOL announce­ment but it seemed unin­for­ma­tive at best.

    Pariah, you are cor­rect that it takes time to mature a good appli­ca­tion in devel­op­ment and pro­mo­tion and that too many apps to focus on can and will throw off devel­op­ment on per­fect­ing the few apps that we should give atten­tion to. I feel that you could merge the func­tion­al­ity of sev­eral of the apps into one like make Kuler an inte­gral part of Adobe Proto and/or Photoshop Touch & Adobe Ideas. Or make the func­tion­al­ity of Adobe Ideas inte­grate with Photoshop Touch.

    I feel that the func­tion­al­ity of what should be one or two apps have been seg­mented into many for the pur­poses of more income for the com­pany but at the sac­ri­fice of cre­ative flex­i­bil­ity of the user.

    I agree that the touch apps should be rethought instead of given the EOL sta­tus. Now I am curi­ous as to other responses to this announcement.

  21. Sally Cox says:

    I whole­heart­edly agree with Pariah on this issue. As a trainer and ACP, I have tire­lessly pro­moted these tools from Day One. I ad access to them and the Touch Tools team long before their release. I devel­oped a video train­ing series on them and worked to cre­ate work­flows that made sense for design­ers. I demoed Proto for Bay Area Mobile shortly after the release, and maybe peo­ple pur­chased it that evening. Now, with no notice, these tools are being dis­con­tin­ued and we are left to answer our clients’ questions.

    Adobe has a long-standing rep­u­ta­tion for lis­ten­ing to cus­tomers and that seems to have been aban­doned in recent years. Clearly, no lessons were learned from the deba­cle of last year. I plead with you, Adobe, don’t aban­don tools that i urged so many peo­ple to pay $9.99 for less than a year ago. This under­mines my author­ity and cre­ates yet another dis­con­nect with the com­mu­nity who so cher­ish your products.

    It is widely assumed apps you pur­chase in the App Store will con­tinue to be sup­ported, and not aban­doned less than a year after their release. All the work I have done to pro­mote them, my video train­ing, all of it is garbage now. That is very dis­heart­en­ing, indeed.

  22. Sally Cox says:

    I whole­heart­edly agree with Pariah on this issue. As a trainer and ACP, I have tire­lessly pro­moted these tools from Day One. I ad access to them and the Touch Tools team long before their release. I devel­oped a video train­ing series on them and worked to cre­ate work­flows that made sense for design­ers. I demoed Proto for Bay Area Mobile shortly after the release, and maybe peo­ple pur­chased it that evening. Now, with no notice, these tools are being dis­con­tin­ued and we are left to answer our clients’ questions.

    Adobe has a long-standing rep­u­ta­tion for lis­ten­ing to cus­tomers and that seems to have been aban­doned in recent years. Clearly, no lessons were learned from the deba­cle of last year. I plead with you, Adobe, don’t aban­don tools that i urged so many peo­ple to pay $9.99 for less than a year ago. This under­mines my author­ity and cre­ates yet another dis­con­nect with the com­mu­nity who so cher­ish your products.

    It is widely assumed apps you pur­chase in the App Store will con­tinue to be sup­ported, and not aban­doned less than a year after their release. All the work I have done to pro­mote them, my video train­ing, all of it is garbage now. That is very dis­heart­en­ing, indeed.

  23. Pariah Burke says:

    @Stephen Interesting per­spec­tive there, that maybe the Touch Apps should have been fewer in num­ber but indi­vid­u­ally more capa­ble. I can cer­tainly see that position.

    Either way, there is… was… a tremen­dous poten­tial in the Touch Apps that went unre­al­ized. They were too early in devel­op­ment. I bought mine--out of pocket, no reimbursement--because I saw their value increas­ing with later releases. I saw them get­ting more capa­ble indi­vid­u­ally as well as offer­ing tighter inte­gra­tion with each and the desk­top applications--that IS the whole point of Creative Cloud Connection. I think many others--both those that already obtained the apps as well as those watch­ing the Touch Apps’ futures--felt the same way. The poten­tial was aborted too early.

    The man­ner of the abor­tion was decid­edly un-Adobe-like… At least, it’s not like the Adobe that was prior to the last 2 years. Maybe this is just another sign that Adobe has indeed changed.

  24. Pariah Burke says:

    @Stephen Interesting per­spec­tive there, that maybe the Touch Apps should have been fewer in num­ber but indi­vid­u­ally more capa­ble. I can cer­tainly see that position.

    Either way, there is… was… a tremen­dous poten­tial in the Touch Apps that went unre­al­ized. They were too early in devel­op­ment. I bought mine--out of pocket, no reimbursement--because I saw their value increas­ing with later releases. I saw them get­ting more capa­ble indi­vid­u­ally as well as offer­ing tighter inte­gra­tion with each and the desk­top applications--that IS the whole point of Creative Cloud Connection. I think many others--both those that already obtained the apps as well as those watch­ing the Touch Apps’ futures--felt the same way. The poten­tial was aborted too early.

    The man­ner of the abor­tion was decid­edly un-Adobe-like… At least, it’s not like the Adobe that was prior to the last 2 years. Maybe this is just another sign that Adobe has indeed changed.

  25. Anthony Sherritt says:

    I see the model Adobe is going for like with the Edge prod­ucts. Test new prod­ucts in small releases, per­fect them, then fold them in to a larger prod­uct. Great. But they aren’t charg­ing $10 a piece for those. And how can they yank func­tion­al­ity with­out pro­vid­ing a replace­ment? So Proto wasn’t right? Fine. It’s already built. Continue to sup­port it, let it out for free if need be, while you fig­ure out how to put it into a Dreamweaver touch app, etc. That short para­graph which amounted to “We’ve decided to go a dif­fer­ent way,” was a real betrayal and slap in the face. What way could they pos­si­bly be going next?

  26. Anthony Sherritt says:

    I see the model Adobe is going for like with the Edge prod­ucts. Test new prod­ucts in small releases, per­fect them, then fold them in to a larger prod­uct. Great. But they aren’t charg­ing $10 a piece for those. And how can they yank func­tion­al­ity with­out pro­vid­ing a replace­ment? So Proto wasn’t right? Fine. It’s already built. Continue to sup­port it, let it out for free if need be, while you fig­ure out how to put it into a Dreamweaver touch app, etc. That short para­graph which amounted to “We’ve decided to go a dif­fer­ent way,” was a real betrayal and slap in the face. What way could they pos­si­bly be going next?

  27. Thank you Pariah for the response. I have a feel­ing that Adobe should start see­ing apps as a more sophis­ti­cated tool instead of just mini appli­ca­tions. Adobe has the abil­ity to change the mean­ing and appli­ca­tion of touch apps by get­ting them pretty close to the func­tion­al­ity of Photoshop, Illustrator, Flash and Dreamweaver from a touch per­spec­tive. That is what I would like to see hap­pen. In addi­tion keep the price low under $9.99 or if pos­si­ble as was put “make them free”. With this being a solid deci­sion by Adobe I sus­pect that they have a myr­iad of rea­sons that has yet to be shared. It would be good to share them and get thoughts or solu­tions from the community.

  28. Thank you Pariah for the response. I have a feel­ing that Adobe should start see­ing apps as a more sophis­ti­cated tool instead of just mini appli­ca­tions. Adobe has the abil­ity to change the mean­ing and appli­ca­tion of touch apps by get­ting them pretty close to the func­tion­al­ity of Photoshop, Illustrator, Flash and Dreamweaver from a touch per­spec­tive. That is what I would like to see hap­pen. In addi­tion keep the price low under $9.99 or if pos­si­ble as was put “make them free”. With this being a solid deci­sion by Adobe I sus­pect that they have a myr­iad of rea­sons that has yet to be shared. It would be good to share them and get thoughts or solu­tions from the community.

  29. Hi Pariah,

    Just to let you & the com­mu­nity know, there was a tech­ni­cal glitch on the Creative Cloud blog that sent all the sub­mit­ted com­ments straight to a spam folder. This has been fixed and the sub­mit­ted com­ments are now live on the site. Apologies for the issue and we do appre­ci­ate the feedback.

    -Rachel

  30. Hi Pariah,

    Just to let you & the com­mu­nity know, there was a tech­ni­cal glitch on the Creative Cloud blog that sent all the sub­mit­ted com­ments straight to a spam folder. This has been fixed and the sub­mit­ted com­ments are now live on the site. Apologies for the issue and we do appre­ci­ate the feedback.

    -Rachel

  31. Pariah Burke says:

    Hi, Rachel.

    Excellent! Thank you for mak­ing sure that hap­pened and for let­ting us know all those pend­ing com­ments have been published.

  32. Pariah Burke says:

    Hi, Rachel.

    Excellent! Thank you for mak­ing sure that hap­pened and for let­ting us know all those pend­ing com­ments have been published.

  33. Pariah Burke says:

    Earlier today Adobe updated Jill’s post. I don’t feel the update was wise. My rea­son is explained in the com­ment I sub­mit­ted on Jill’s post; it hasn’t shown up yet on Jill’s post, so I’ll reprint it here:

    Thank you for the update, Jill, though it doesn’t really say any­thing among all those words. I really hope that isn’t the final, offi­cial word on the subject.

    You didn’t address the main issue of the dam­age the deci­sion and method of EOL does to Adobe’s cred­i­bil­ity. In fact, the update exac­er­bates the sit­u­a­tion by being unapolo­getic and imply­ing Adobe would end of life future apps in the same man­ner if these apps, regard­less of cus­tomer opin­ions, aren’t liv­ing up to an arbi­trary inter­nal stan­dard you don’t appar­ently see fit to reveal.

  34. Pariah Burke says:

    Earlier today Adobe updated Jill’s post. I don’t feel the update was wise. My rea­son is explained in the com­ment I sub­mit­ted on Jill’s post; it hasn’t shown up yet on Jill’s post, so I’ll reprint it here:

    Thank you for the update, Jill, though it doesn’t really say any­thing among all those words. I really hope that isn’t the final, offi­cial word on the subject.

    You didn’t address the main issue of the dam­age the deci­sion and method of EOL does to Adobe’s cred­i­bil­ity. In fact, the update exac­er­bates the sit­u­a­tion by being unapolo­getic and imply­ing Adobe would end of life future apps in the same man­ner if these apps, regard­less of cus­tomer opin­ions, aren’t liv­ing up to an arbi­trary inter­nal stan­dard you don’t appar­ently see fit to reveal.

  35. I’m sur­prised to hear you say this sort of behav­ior is a recent change at Adobe, although I’ll agree it’s got­ten much worse lately. I left Adobe in early 2007, after six years with Macromedia, because of their inter­nal bureau­cracy and “consensus-driven” approach to doing any­thing. Adobe is so risk averse that it con­tin­u­ally chops and changes its prod­uct lineup at the first sign of “fail­ure” and has been clue­less about the via­bil­ity and pric­ing of prod­ucts for years, cer­tainly dat­ing back to when I still worked there. Part of their stated rea­son for buy­ing Macromedia was to improve how they worked with their com­mu­nity, by learn­ing from Macromedia, but that effort seems to have been com­pletely aban­doned over the last half decade and they seem to con­stantly shoot their com­mu­nity in the foot with lack of com­mu­ni­ca­tion and bizarre / ran­dom prod­uct direc­tion changes. Last year I real­ized I no longer used any Adobe soft­ware - I’d switched to cheaper and/or bet­ter alter­na­tives for every­thing. It felt very strange unin­stalling Creative Suite and all their stand­alone soft­ware after it had been such a sta­ple in my daily work­flow for so many years pre­vi­ous. Strange, but also very lib­er­at­ing. I cer­tainly wouldn’t bet my busi­ness or my rep­u­ta­tion on Adobe these days…

  36. I’m sur­prised to hear you say this sort of behav­ior is a recent change at Adobe, although I’ll agree it’s got­ten much worse lately. I left Adobe in early 2007, after six years with Macromedia, because of their inter­nal bureau­cracy and “consensus-driven” approach to doing any­thing. Adobe is so risk averse that it con­tin­u­ally chops and changes its prod­uct lineup at the first sign of “fail­ure” and has been clue­less about the via­bil­ity and pric­ing of prod­ucts for years, cer­tainly dat­ing back to when I still worked there. Part of their stated rea­son for buy­ing Macromedia was to improve how they worked with their com­mu­nity, by learn­ing from Macromedia, but that effort seems to have been com­pletely aban­doned over the last half decade and they seem to con­stantly shoot their com­mu­nity in the foot with lack of com­mu­ni­ca­tion and bizarre / ran­dom prod­uct direc­tion changes. Last year I real­ized I no longer used any Adobe soft­ware - I’d switched to cheaper and/or bet­ter alter­na­tives for every­thing. It felt very strange unin­stalling Creative Suite and all their stand­alone soft­ware after it had been such a sta­ple in my daily work­flow for so many years pre­vi­ous. Strange, but also very lib­er­at­ing. I cer­tainly wouldn’t bet my busi­ness or my rep­u­ta­tion on Adobe these days…

  37. jack Whidden says:

    I agree with Steve Burns that Adobe needs to see apps as sophis­ti­cated tools rather than mini apps.

    For some decades now (I go back to PS v.1.0) I’ve felt that Adobe has suf­fered from “larges­sos­ity.” If a com­pet­ing prod­uct looks like it’s actu­ally mak­ing some real money, Adobe just tries to buy it out to get it off the mar­ket or if unable to do so, just bring in some soft­ware geeks and add the com­pet­ing fea­tures to its exist­ing prod­ucts. If a small pro­to­type prod­uct isn’t a really super-big win right out the gate, it seems that bottom-line-watching man­agers feel that some VP upstairs is hun­gry to exer­cise his or her power and so the man­agers fear los­ing their jobs and become all too will­ing to throw the fledg­ling prod­uct under the bus. And, frankly, things like apps are just “lite” for truly seri­ous macro-thinking prod­uct man­agers and VPs whose life work is to “climb to the top.” It seems that Steve’s use of the notion of an app being a “sophis­ti­cated tool” might well be a tag that will allow Adobe man­age­ment to see apps in a more prof­itable light.

  38. jack Whidden says:

    I agree with Steve Burns that Adobe needs to see apps as sophis­ti­cated tools rather than mini apps.

    For some decades now (I go back to PS v.1.0) I’ve felt that Adobe has suf­fered from “larges­sos­ity.” If a com­pet­ing prod­uct looks like it’s actu­ally mak­ing some real money, Adobe just tries to buy it out to get it off the mar­ket or if unable to do so, just bring in some soft­ware geeks and add the com­pet­ing fea­tures to its exist­ing prod­ucts. If a small pro­to­type prod­uct isn’t a really super-big win right out the gate, it seems that bottom-line-watching man­agers feel that some VP upstairs is hun­gry to exer­cise his or her power and so the man­agers fear los­ing their jobs and become all too will­ing to throw the fledg­ling prod­uct under the bus. And, frankly, things like apps are just “lite” for truly seri­ous macro-thinking prod­uct man­agers and VPs whose life work is to “climb to the top.” It seems that Steve’s use of the notion of an app being a “sophis­ti­cated tool” might well be a tag that will allow Adobe man­age­ment to see apps in a more prof­itable light.

  39. Albert Peña says:

    @Pariah. Thank you for post­ing on the Linkedin Adobe Illustrator Group. I read through a major­ity of all the responses. Agree with a mul­ti­tude of you on here. Using Adobe prod­ucts since 1996? I believe? and since that day ONE of my first Photoshop class at the Art Institute of Dallas.
    I have noticed how Adobe reck­lessly changes soft­ware like NOBODY ever pays atten­tion. So my hope is that this and other dis­cus­sions and responses are fruit­ful. Look for­ward to read­ing more and see what tran­spires on this par­tic­u­lar topic. THANKS AGAIN! Pariah for your post­ing. Regards!

  40. Albert Peña says:

    @Pariah. Thank you for post­ing on the Linkedin Adobe Illustrator Group. I read through a major­ity of all the responses. Agree with a mul­ti­tude of you on here. Using Adobe prod­ucts since 1996? I believe? and since that day ONE of my first Photoshop class at the Art Institute of Dallas.
    I have noticed how Adobe reck­lessly changes soft­ware like NOBODY ever pays atten­tion. So my hope is that this and other dis­cus­sions and responses are fruit­ful. Look for­ward to read­ing more and see what tran­spires on this par­tic­u­lar topic. THANKS AGAIN! Pariah for your post­ing. Regards!

  41. Pariah Burke says:

    I just got off a call with some peo­ple at Adobe, includ­ing Jill Soley, the author of the orig­i­nal Touch Apps EOL blog post. There’s noth­ing con­crete to report yet, but a lot of poeo­ple within Adobe are doing quite a lot of talk­ing and brain­storm­ing toward fig­ur­ing out ways to avoid sna­fus like this in the future.

  42. Pariah Burke says:

    I just got off a call with some peo­ple at Adobe, includ­ing Jill Soley, the author of the orig­i­nal Touch Apps EOL blog post. There’s noth­ing con­crete to report yet, but a lot of poeo­ple within Adobe are doing quite a lot of talk­ing and brain­storm­ing toward fig­ur­ing out ways to avoid sna­fus like this in the future.

  43. HI Pariah,

    Thank you for tak­ing the time to write this open let­ter, I will make sure to add the #AdobeTouch hash­tag when I share your post, as it cer­tainly sums up my own feel­ings on the untimely demise of Adobe Touch apps.

    It was cer­tainly a shock to lose such promis­ing apps, espe­cially after inte­grat­ing them into my work­flow. Funnily enough I found Collage (the least morned) the most use­ful app of the lot as it pro­vide a quick way to build a mood board while work­ing on design concepts.

    One thing that I think may have been over­looked in this dis­cus­sion is the arrival of Windows 8, which brings the touch expe­ri­ence to the desk­top, lap­top and tablet form fac­tors. CES 2013 has brought with it a raft of new devices which are far more pow­er­ful than an iPad or Android from a Creative pro­fes­sion­als stand­point as they are capa­ble of run­ning full the full blow CS apps.

    Most of these new Windows “Tablet” devices come with a highly accu­rate sty­lus as well which negates the need for pur­pose built touch apps such as PS Touch. I know if I had the choice between a cut­down ver­sion of Photoshop or the real deal in a sim­i­lar form fac­tor with the accu­racy and pres­sure sen­si­tiv­ity of a sty­lus, I would choose the later.

    So with the above in mind I think it’s only a mat­ter of time before most of us get tired of car­ry­ing around mul­ti­ple devices and pay­ing for apps that only pro­vide a small frac­tion of the cre­ative options that a desk­top class appli­ca­tion provides.

    Still, I liked the sim­plic­ity of a the Adobe Touch apps, and they will be sorely missed from my workflow.

    Cheers, sf d-)=

  44. HI Pariah,

    Thank you for tak­ing the time to write this open let­ter, I will make sure to add the #AdobeTouch hash­tag when I share your post, as it cer­tainly sums up my own feel­ings on the untimely demise of Adobe Touch apps.

    It was cer­tainly a shock to lose such promis­ing apps, espe­cially after inte­grat­ing them into my work­flow. Funnily enough I found Collage (the least morned) the most use­ful app of the lot as it pro­vide a quick way to build a mood board while work­ing on design concepts.

    One thing that I think may have been over­looked in this dis­cus­sion is the arrival of Windows 8, which brings the touch expe­ri­ence to the desk­top, lap­top and tablet form fac­tors. CES 2013 has brought with it a raft of new devices which are far more pow­er­ful than an iPad or Android from a Creative pro­fes­sion­als stand­point as they are capa­ble of run­ning full the full blow CS apps.

    Most of these new Windows “Tablet” devices come with a highly accu­rate sty­lus as well which negates the need for pur­pose built touch apps such as PS Touch. I know if I had the choice between a cut­down ver­sion of Photoshop or the real deal in a sim­i­lar form fac­tor with the accu­racy and pres­sure sen­si­tiv­ity of a sty­lus, I would choose the later.

    So with the above in mind I think it’s only a mat­ter of time before most of us get tired of car­ry­ing around mul­ti­ple devices and pay­ing for apps that only pro­vide a small frac­tion of the cre­ative options that a desk­top class appli­ca­tion provides.

    Still, I liked the sim­plic­ity of a the Adobe Touch apps, and they will be sorely missed from my workflow.

    Cheers, sf d-)=

  45. Pariah Burke says:

    Looking for replace­ment tablet apps? I wrote a piece on CreativePro​.com pro­vid­ing replace­ments for Adobe Touch Apps. http://​www​.cre​ative​pro​.com/​a​r​t​i​c​l​e​/​r​e​p​l​a​c​i​n​g​-​a​d​o​b​e​-​t​o​u​c​h​-apps

    Many cre­ative pros’ work­flows are dis­rupted by the dis­con­tin­u­a­tion of Adobe’s Touch Apps—other cre­atives never even got to try them. Pariah Burke found the apps you need to replace Adobe Touch Apps on your iPad, iPhone, and Android tablets and phones.

  46. Pariah Burke says:

    Looking for replace­ment tablet apps? I wrote a piece on CreativePro​.com pro­vid­ing replace­ments for Adobe Touch Apps. http://​www​.cre​ative​pro​.com/​a​r​t​i​c​l​e​/​r​e​p​l​a​c​i​n​g​-​a​d​o​b​e​-​t​o​u​c​h​-apps

    Many cre­ative pros’ work­flows are dis­rupted by the dis­con­tin­u­a­tion of Adobe’s Touch Apps—other cre­atives never even got to try them. Pariah Burke found the apps you need to replace Adobe Touch Apps on your iPad, iPhone, and Android tablets and phones.

  47. T. A Brunemeyer says:

    I do flags, I do ban­ners, I do signs. Little ol’ men and women come in and want flags ban­ners and signs. The have no idea what a PC is let alone vec­tor or raster art. I am not an artist or I don’t call myself one but it’s nice when I can whip out my iPad take a snap and build a new piece for my cus­tomer. Now I am not their yet I can get around in Illustrator and inkscape but when I found ideas the other day I thought to myself ‘this is gonna be good’ now I see that though ideas isn’t gone (yet?) sup­port and hype for the touch apps is wan­ing (or thats the impres­sion Im get­ting).
    Personally I say push this stuff. A Ps that’s so sim­ple my father can use it but has enough depth for power users. Ideas, think about it, so sim­ple a kinder­gartener can use it that pro­duces pieces that can be used for any size or media out there. As to the rest of em. I haven’t played with em yet but I want Kuler on my iPad. I need to have color match­ing (PMS please)otherwise it’s all guess work and hav­ing some cus­tomer say “I didn’t want that blue, I wanted THAT blue” really bites.

  48. T. A Brunemeyer says:

    I do flags, I do ban­ners, I do signs. Little ol’ men and women come in and want flags ban­ners and signs. The have no idea what a PC is let alone vec­tor or raster art. I am not an artist or I don’t call myself one but it’s nice when I can whip out my iPad take a snap and build a new piece for my cus­tomer. Now I am not their yet I can get around in Illustrator and inkscape but when I found ideas the other day I thought to myself ‘this is gonna be good’ now I see that though ideas isn’t gone (yet?) sup­port and hype for the touch apps is wan­ing (or thats the impres­sion Im get­ting).
    Personally I say push this stuff. A Ps that’s so sim­ple my father can use it but has enough depth for power users. Ideas, think about it, so sim­ple a kinder­gartener can use it that pro­duces pieces that can be used for any size or media out there. As to the rest of em. I haven’t played with em yet but I want Kuler on my iPad. I need to have color match­ing (PMS please)otherwise it’s all guess work and hav­ing some cus­tomer say “I didn’t want that blue, I wanted THAT blue” really bites.