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An Open Letter to Adobe About the Premature End of Adobe Touch Apps

2012-12-20-RIP-Adobe-Touch-Apps

On December 20th, 2012 Adobe quietly announced via a blog post that it is discontinuing several of the Adobe Touch apps. Those who missed the blog post may also have noticed that the touch apps suddenly disappeared from the Creative Cloud dashboard.

Here’s what Jill Soley, Adobe Creative Cloud Team, wrote:

Over the past year, we’ve been exploring how the creative process can be augmented and enhanced on touch devices. While some of our efforts have been successful, others have been less so. Therefore, starting today, we will no longer be updating Adobe Debut, Adobe Collage, Adobe Proto, or the Android versions of Adobe Ideas and Adobe Kuler.

Here’s my open letter to Adobe about that announcement. Please feel free to express your opinion as well.

———

Dear Adobe:

I just saw the post on the Creative Cloud Team Blog about cancelling most of the Adobe Touch apps. There are several discussions springing up about the decision on Google+, Facebook, and elsewhere. The general feeling is that you made the decision too soon, with many people chalking it up to what appears over the last year as Adobe’s increasing breakdown of internal communications between departments, product teams, and program managers—but that’s another discussion for another day.

Focusing on the Touch Apps discontinuance, I think the decision is premature. Granted, I don’t know what your sales numbers are for the Touch apps, what new directions you may be pursuing, but some of those apps are younger than 7 months. How can you expect to see products succeed or fail in only 7 months or even in 18 months? Tablets and tablet software are still young and very much in a state of flux. We only this year moved into the “HD” range of tablets.

Adobe’s marketing of the Touch apps was overshadowed by the focus on Creative Cloud and marred by the whole confusion of having to buy the Touch Apps from Apple and then seek a Creative Cloud subscription credit. How could the market even keep up with everything new out there? Since May 2012 Adobe and program partners (like me) have been promoting all of the following at the same time.

  • 13 full product updates to CS6
  • Adobe Muse going 1.0
  • Acrobat XI launch
  • A move to 12-month full product release cycles
  • The Creative Cloud launch
  • Later the Creative Cloud for Teams launch
  • Creative Cloud Connection “coming soon”
  • Creative Cloud Connection arriving
  • Edge Tools
  • Adobe moving into the game development arena
  • The CS6 focus on HTML5
  • The launch of Elearning Suite and update of its constituent products
  • The launch of the Digital Publishing Suite
  • Story Plus
  • Digital Publishing Suite Single Edition going free to publish
  • Typekit roll-out
  • Lightroom 4 release
  • Lightroom being added to the Creative Cloud
  • The announcement that Creative Cloud members get new features every 3-months
  • New features in Illustrator CS6 for Cloud subscribers
  • New features in InDesign CS6 for Cloud subscribers
  • New features in Photoshop CS6 for Cloud subscribers

And then, somewhere amidst all that, is also…

  • New Adobe Proto
  • New Adobe Debut
  • New Adobe Collage
  • New Adobe Kuler for Android
  • Update to Adobe Ideas
  • Update to Photoshop Touch

Is it any surprise customers haven’t adopted all the Touch apps? They don’t know about all them because they can’t keep up with all the announcements and promotion. It’s tough for me to do so and I’m an Adobe partner with early access to the information and then a job wherein I need to know every new app and application, every new feature, and then figure out how these can best benefit real-world creative and production workflows. How can you expect designers working 40–80 hours a week to keep up with all the new products and announcements from Adobe over the last 7 months? Cut them—and your apps—some slack.

Give the Touch Apps more time.

And stop charging $9.99 for them. Give them away for a couple of years to gain traction. If you like, leave the in-app purchase upgrades like extra layers in Adobe Ideas, but make Adobe Ideas app itself free. Make them all free.

These apps can have both short- and long-term positive impact for Adobe.

In the short term, they integrate with full applications in ways most people don’t know about—for instance, almost no one knows Proto designs can be opened on the desktop in Dreamweaver, complete with all the JavaScript, CSS, and other assets required to reproduce the entire Proto site sketch in a real site instantly publishable from Dreamweaver. The integration with the desktop apps is what will make these sell, and they, in turn, will help sell your desktop products. Competing mobile apps can’t match that integration, so once the public learns about it, Adobe Touch apps will have greater value and dominate the mobile creative space the way Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, Flash, Dreamweaver, and all the rest already dominate the desktop creative space.

In the long-term, they provide two valuable things: First, they keep an Adobe presence on the next computing platform. Second, they prove that Adobe understands Mobile, which is important because Adobe was 10 years late to understanding the Web and 3 years late to getting it’s head into the whole smartphone movement. After 10 years Adobe still doesn’t get ebooks (EPUB, MOBI, KF8, etc.), and the market knows that. You need the tablet presence these apps give you.

In fact, I think you need to expand the number of platforms. Find some way to make these apps work on the customized Android 2.x platforms like the Kindle Fire line and NOOK Tablet line. Drop the price of the Touch apps from $9.99 to free, then use them as an egress into Creative Cloud. Let people see in each app not just their Creative Cloud-stored files but the desktop apps they could get with a Creative Cloud subscription. Let them subscribe directly within the Touch apps’ UIs.

At least, that’s my two cents.

Regards,

Pariah Burke
http://iamPariah.com@iamPariahhttp://about.me/pariahburke

Now in the Eastern timezone!

Consulting & Training: ePublishing, Digital Publishing, Creative Workflows, Creative Software

Informing & Empowering Creative Professionals.™

———

Update 2013-01-02: Comments on Jill’s post are apparently disabled as there are none, and I know I submitted one on December 20th.

Update: 2013-01-03: If you discuss the termination (End of Life or EOL) of Adobe Touch apps in social media, please include the hashtag #AdobeTouch (as you can see here on Twitter) . I’ve been informed that Adobe only sees discussions with hashtags, and that Adobe currently believes no one is discussing the Adobe Touch apps being ended or in such a manner. Make sure Adobe sees your reaction by including the #AdobeTouch hashtag in your conversations.

Update 2013-01-04: Comments on Jill’s post have been restored—dozens of them. See comment below from Adobe representative Rachel Luxemburg for the reason they didn’t appear until now.

Update: 2013-01-07: I just got off a call with some people at Adobe, includ­ing Jill Soley, the author of the orig­i­nal Touch Apps EOL blog post. There’s nothing concrete to report yet, but a lot of people within Adobe are doing quite a lot of talk­ing and brain­storm­ing toward fig­ur­ing out ways to avoid snafus like this in the future.

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25 Responses

  1. Fireboy says:

    “Let them sub­scribe directly within the Touch apps’ UIs.”

    Could you imagine them paying 30% to Apple from a in-app purchase of the creative cloud. NOT.

  2. Fireboy says:

    “Let them sub­scribe directly within the Touch apps’ UIs.”

    Could you imagine them paying 30% to Apple from a in-app purchase of the creative cloud. NOT.

  3. Buck Sommerkamp says:

    And somewhere in there (to add to your list) – Adobe FINALLY made Photoshop Touch available to those of us with Nexus 7 devices who had been very disappointed (for many months) that Photoshop Touch was not available for this sparkling new tablet. Now that it works on the Nexus 7, it seems that my hope for other Touch apps has been dashed by this sudden discontinuance and (as usual) terrible communication from Adobe. It’s like the midnight vote on the fiscal cliff — way to quietly announce something over the holidays. I’m glad I never really trusted Proto; it looked so promising but never realized its potential. Wow, Adobe…here’s a potato gun. Feel free to shoot yourselves in the foot.

  4. Buck Sommerkamp says:

    And somewhere in there (to add to your list) – Adobe FINALLY made Photoshop Touch available to those of us with Nexus 7 devices who had been very disappointed (for many months) that Photoshop Touch was not available for this sparkling new tablet. Now that it works on the Nexus 7, it seems that my hope for other Touch apps has been dashed by this sudden discontinuance and (as usual) terrible communication from Adobe. It’s like the midnight vote on the fiscal cliff — way to quietly announce something over the holidays. I’m glad I never really trusted Proto; it looked so promising but never realized its potential. Wow, Adobe…here’s a potato gun. Feel free to shoot yourselves in the foot.

  5. I agree that these apps did not get a fair shake in the marketplace. Many of them were not even released on the iPad until much later than the original May release for Creative Cloud, so how can they say that they were not viable? Also the $9.99 pricetag for Proto was a bit steep. PS Touch was a great value at $9.99 but the other apps were not as hefty. Debut didn’t even make it to the iPad!

    I am sad to see that Adobe has EOL the majority of these products instead of phasing out the 1-2 products that were not needed (Kuler and Collage) and promoted the remainder (Proto/Debut) with a new price point and more aggressive marketing. I for one loved Debut and the ability to view native/raw Creative Suite documents without having to convert to a jpg or PDF to view on my tablet.

  6. I agree that these apps did not get a fair shake in the marketplace. Many of them were not even released on the iPad until much later than the original May release for Creative Cloud, so how can they say that they were not viable? Also the $9.99 pricetag for Proto was a bit steep. PS Touch was a great value at $9.99 but the other apps were not as hefty. Debut didn’t even make it to the iPad!

    I am sad to see that Adobe has EOL the majority of these products instead of phasing out the 1-2 products that were not needed (Kuler and Collage) and promoted the remainder (Proto/Debut) with a new price point and more aggressive marketing. I for one loved Debut and the ability to view native/raw Creative Suite documents without having to convert to a jpg or PDF to view on my tablet.

  7. Jeremy H says:

    Well said. As an Adobe UGM and a devoted Adobe user, I am actually getting scared off by Adobe’s seeming lack of stability these last few years. There have been a lot of changes, no clear direction and their marketing and communications in general is being run as if they were a small start-up software company. I am holding off on implementing Business Catalyst and the Creative Cloud for my company because I am not certain that either will be there in 12 months. As a business owner, why would I invest in a product that I can’t be sure will be there in a few months.

  8. Jeremy H says:

    Well said. As an Adobe UGM and a devoted Adobe user, I am actually getting scared off by Adobe’s seeming lack of stability these last few years. There have been a lot of changes, no clear direction and their marketing and communications in general is being run as if they were a small start-up software company. I am holding off on implementing Business Catalyst and the Creative Cloud for my company because I am not certain that either will be there in 12 months. As a business owner, why would I invest in a product that I can’t be sure will be there in a few months.

  9. Interesting perspective, Jeremy.

  10. Interesting perspective, Jeremy.

  11. Worajedt Sitthidumrong says:

    Thank you for your valuable opinion and for every comments here also.
    I’s one of the Adobe UGM and know how hard to do the same tasks as Pariah with many app announcement like this.

    Jeremy’s opinion is very interesting. I’m feeling in the same boat. Many time I feel like Adobe Product upgrade isn’t worth overall. Photoshop may be good. But look at what happen with Flash Catalyst and how much feature upgrade for Flash Pro, and don’t event have to mention about Dreamweaver that can’t catch up with the world that changed to web framework. Most of the top web designer never use DW any more. Sublime TextEditor or IDE + good framework (that adobe didn’t support like Bootstrap, Less, Retina Web Support etc..)

    And Proto, one of the app I use frequently event it’s not the best. EOL now..

  12. Worajedt Sitthidumrong says:

    Thank you for your valuable opinion and for every comments here also.
    I’s one of the Adobe UGM and know how hard to do the same tasks as Pariah with many app announcement like this.

    Jeremy’s opinion is very interesting. I’m feeling in the same boat. Many time I feel like Adobe Product upgrade isn’t worth overall. Photoshop may be good. But look at what happen with Flash Catalyst and how much feature upgrade for Flash Pro, and don’t event have to mention about Dreamweaver that can’t catch up with the world that changed to web framework. Most of the top web designer never use DW any more. Sublime TextEditor or IDE + good framework (that adobe didn’t support like Bootstrap, Less, Retina Web Support etc..)

    And Proto, one of the app I use frequently event it’s not the best. EOL now..

  13. Anthony Sherritt says:

    This is pure BULL SH%T! Why do they keep doing this to their community?! I showed everyone in the office Proto and Collage. They were all excited about it. Now, once again like after Flash Catalyst got pulled, I look and feel like a moron. I love Adobe products. I pay for them. It is how I make my living, but now you are really screwing with me. Whats next?! You are a huge company. If Steve Jobs could communicate with his community, why not you?! I’m sick of this. Where can I complain?

  14. Anthony Sherritt says:

    This is pure BULL SH%T! Why do they keep doing this to their community?! I showed everyone in the office Proto and Collage. They were all excited about it. Now, once again like after Flash Catalyst got pulled, I look and feel like a moron. I love Adobe products. I pay for them. It is how I make my living, but now you are really screwing with me. Whats next?! You are a huge company. If Steve Jobs could communicate with his community, why not you?! I’m sick of this. Where can I complain?

  15. And where does this leave those of us who made the investment on faith that the relationship between devices would grow?

  16. And where does this leave those of us who made the investment on faith that the relationship between devices would grow?

  17. A colleague of mine summed up this situation by pointing out that Adobe has validated it’s critics assertion that Adobe doesn’t commit to anything, that Adobe “dabbles,”–it dabbles in services, it dabbles in mobile, it dabbles in different things without committing to them–and that serious businesses need to be very wary about aligning themselves with Adobe’s dabbles.

  18. A colleague of mine summed up this situation by pointing out that Adobe has validated it’s critics assertion that Adobe doesn’t commit to anything, that Adobe “dabbles,”–it dabbles in services, it dabbles in mobile, it dabbles in different things without committing to them–and that serious businesses need to be very wary about aligning themselves with Adobe’s dabbles.

  19. Hey everyone,

    Interesting news.

    I would like to hear more from Adobe as to their reasons for discontinuing some of the touch apps. I am not sure if there is more to the blog post about the EOL announcement but it seemed uninformative at best.

    Pariah, you are correct that it takes time to mature a good application in development and promotion and that too many apps to focus on can and will throw off development on perfecting the few apps that we should give attention to. I feel that you could merge the functionality of several of the apps into one like make Kuler an integral part of Adobe Proto and/or Photoshop Touch & Adobe Ideas. Or make the functionality of Adobe Ideas integrate with Photoshop Touch.

    I feel that the functionality of what should be one or two apps have been segmented into many for the purposes of more income for the company but at the sacrifice of creative flexibility of the user.

    I agree that the touch apps should be rethought instead of given the EOL status. Now I am curious as to other responses to this announcement.

  20. Hey everyone,

    Interesting news.

    I would like to hear more from Adobe as to their reasons for discontinuing some of the touch apps. I am not sure if there is more to the blog post about the EOL announcement but it seemed uninformative at best.

    Pariah, you are correct that it takes time to mature a good application in development and promotion and that too many apps to focus on can and will throw off development on perfecting the few apps that we should give attention to. I feel that you could merge the functionality of several of the apps into one like make Kuler an integral part of Adobe Proto and/or Photoshop Touch & Adobe Ideas. Or make the functionality of Adobe Ideas integrate with Photoshop Touch.

    I feel that the functionality of what should be one or two apps have been segmented into many for the purposes of more income for the company but at the sacrifice of creative flexibility of the user.

    I agree that the touch apps should be rethought instead of given the EOL status. Now I am curious as to other responses to this announcement.

  21. Sally Cox says:

    I wholeheartedly agree with Pariah on this issue. As a trainer and ACP, I have tirelessly promoted these tools from Day One. I ad access to them and the Touch Tools team long before their release. I developed a video training series on them and worked to create workflows that made sense for designers. I demoed Proto for Bay Area Mobile shortly after the release, and maybe people purchased it that evening. Now, with no notice, these tools are being discontinued and we are left to answer our clients’ questions.

    Adobe has a long-standing reputation for listening to customers and that seems to have been abandoned in recent years. Clearly, no lessons were learned from the debacle of last year. I plead with you, Adobe, don’t abandon tools that i urged so many people to pay $9.99 for less than a year ago. This undermines my authority and creates yet another disconnect with the community who so cherish your products.

    It is widely assumed apps you purchase in the App Store will continue to be supported, and not abandoned less than a year after their release. All the work I have done to promote them, my video training, all of it is garbage now. That is very disheartening, indeed.

  22. Sally Cox says:

    I wholeheartedly agree with Pariah on this issue. As a trainer and ACP, I have tirelessly promoted these tools from Day One. I ad access to them and the Touch Tools team long before their release. I developed a video training series on them and worked to create workflows that made sense for designers. I demoed Proto for Bay Area Mobile shortly after the release, and maybe people purchased it that evening. Now, with no notice, these tools are being discontinued and we are left to answer our clients’ questions.

    Adobe has a long-standing reputation for listening to customers and that seems to have been abandoned in recent years. Clearly, no lessons were learned from the debacle of last year. I plead with you, Adobe, don’t abandon tools that i urged so many people to pay $9.99 for less than a year ago. This undermines my authority and creates yet another disconnect with the community who so cherish your products.

    It is widely assumed apps you purchase in the App Store will continue to be supported, and not abandoned less than a year after their release. All the work I have done to promote them, my video training, all of it is garbage now. That is very disheartening, indeed.

  23. @Stephen Interesting perspective there, that maybe the Touch Apps should have been fewer in number but individually more capable. I can certainly see that position.

    Either way, there is… was… a tremendous potential in the Touch Apps that went unrealized. They were too early in development. I bought mine–out of pocket, no reimbursement–because I saw their value increasing with later releases. I saw them getting more capable individually as well as offering tighter integration with each and the desktop applications–that IS the whole point of Creative Cloud Connection. I think many others–both those that already obtained the apps as well as those watching the Touch Apps’ futures–felt the same way. The potential was aborted too early.

    The manner of the abortion was decidedly un-Adobe-like… At least, it’s not like the Adobe that was prior to the last 2 years. Maybe this is just another sign that Adobe has indeed changed.

  24. @Stephen Interesting perspective there, that maybe the Touch Apps should have been fewer in number but individually more capable. I can certainly see that position.

    Either way, there is… was… a tremendous potential in the Touch Apps that went unrealized. They were too early in development. I bought mine–out of pocket, no reimbursement–because I saw their value increasing with later releases. I saw them getting more capable individually as well as offering tighter integration with each and the desktop applications–that IS the whole point of Creative Cloud Connection. I think many others–both those that already obtained the apps as well as those watching the Touch Apps’ futures–felt the same way. The potential was aborted too early.

    The manner of the abortion was decidedly un-Adobe-like… At least, it’s not like the Adobe that was prior to the last 2 years. Maybe this is just another sign that Adobe has indeed changed.

  25. Anthony Sherritt says:

    I see the model Adobe is going for like with the Edge products. Test new products in small releases, perfect them, then fold them in to a larger product. Great. But they aren’t charging $10 a piece for those. And how can they yank functionality without providing a replacement? So Proto wasn’t right? Fine. It’s already built. Continue to support it, let it out for free if need be, while you figure out how to put it into a Dreamweaver touch app, etc. That short paragraph which amounted to “We’ve decided to go a different way,” was a real betrayal and slap in the face. What way could they possibly be going next?

  26. Anthony Sherritt says:

    I see the model Adobe is going for like with the Edge products. Test new products in small releases, perfect them, then fold them in to a larger product. Great. But they aren’t charging $10 a piece for those. And how can they yank functionality without providing a replacement? So Proto wasn’t right? Fine. It’s already built. Continue to support it, let it out for free if need be, while you figure out how to put it into a Dreamweaver touch app, etc. That short paragraph which amounted to “We’ve decided to go a different way,” was a real betrayal and slap in the face. What way could they possibly be going next?

  27. Thank you Pariah for the response. I have a feeling that Adobe should start seeing apps as a more sophisticated tool instead of just mini applications. Adobe has the ability to change the meaning and application of touch apps by getting them pretty close to the functionality of Photoshop, Illustrator, Flash and Dreamweaver from a touch perspective. That is what I would like to see happen. In addition keep the price low under $9.99 or if possible as was put “make them free”. With this being a solid decision by Adobe I suspect that they have a myriad of reasons that has yet to be shared. It would be good to share them and get thoughts or solutions from the community.

  28. Thank you Pariah for the response. I have a feeling that Adobe should start seeing apps as a more sophisticated tool instead of just mini applications. Adobe has the ability to change the meaning and application of touch apps by getting them pretty close to the functionality of Photoshop, Illustrator, Flash and Dreamweaver from a touch perspective. That is what I would like to see happen. In addition keep the price low under $9.99 or if possible as was put “make them free”. With this being a solid decision by Adobe I suspect that they have a myriad of reasons that has yet to be shared. It would be good to share them and get thoughts or solutions from the community.

  29. Hi Pariah,

    Just to let you & the community know, there was a technical glitch on the Creative Cloud blog that sent all the submitted comments straight to a spam folder. This has been fixed and the submitted comments are now live on the site. Apologies for the issue and we do appreciate the feedback.

    -Rachel

  30. Hi Pariah,

    Just to let you & the community know, there was a technical glitch on the Creative Cloud blog that sent all the submitted comments straight to a spam folder. This has been fixed and the submitted comments are now live on the site. Apologies for the issue and we do appreciate the feedback.

    -Rachel

  31. Hi, Rachel.

    Excellent! Thank you for making sure that happened and for letting us know all those pending comments have been published.

  32. Hi, Rachel.

    Excellent! Thank you for making sure that happened and for letting us know all those pending comments have been published.

  33. Earlier today Adobe updated Jill’s post. I don’t feel the update was wise. My reason is explained in the comment I submitted on Jill’s post; it hasn’t shown up yet on Jill’s post, so I’ll reprint it here:

    Thank you for the update, Jill, though it doesn’t really say anything among all those words. I really hope that isn’t the final, official word on the subject.

    You didn’t address the main issue of the damage the decision and method of EOL does to Adobe’s credibility. In fact, the update exacerbates the situation by being unapologetic and implying Adobe would end of life future apps in the same manner if these apps, regardless of customer opinions, aren’t living up to an arbitrary internal standard you don’t apparently see fit to reveal.

  34. Earlier today Adobe updated Jill’s post. I don’t feel the update was wise. My reason is explained in the comment I submitted on Jill’s post; it hasn’t shown up yet on Jill’s post, so I’ll reprint it here:

    Thank you for the update, Jill, though it doesn’t really say anything among all those words. I really hope that isn’t the final, official word on the subject.

    You didn’t address the main issue of the damage the decision and method of EOL does to Adobe’s credibility. In fact, the update exacerbates the situation by being unapologetic and implying Adobe would end of life future apps in the same manner if these apps, regardless of customer opinions, aren’t living up to an arbitrary internal standard you don’t apparently see fit to reveal.

  35. I’m surprised to hear you say this sort of behavior is a recent change at Adobe, although I’ll agree it’s gotten much worse lately. I left Adobe in early 2007, after six years with Macromedia, because of their internal bureaucracy and “consensus-driven” approach to doing anything. Adobe is so risk averse that it continually chops and changes its product lineup at the first sign of “failure” and has been clueless about the viability and pricing of products for years, certainly dating back to when I still worked there. Part of their stated reason for buying Macromedia was to improve how they worked with their community, by learning from Macromedia, but that effort seems to have been completely abandoned over the last half decade and they seem to constantly shoot their community in the foot with lack of communication and bizarre / random product direction changes. Last year I realized I no longer used any Adobe software – I’d switched to cheaper and/or better alternatives for everything. It felt very strange uninstalling Creative Suite and all their standalone software after it had been such a staple in my daily workflow for so many years previous. Strange, but also very liberating. I certainly wouldn’t bet my business or my reputation on Adobe these days…

  36. I’m surprised to hear you say this sort of behavior is a recent change at Adobe, although I’ll agree it’s gotten much worse lately. I left Adobe in early 2007, after six years with Macromedia, because of their internal bureaucracy and “consensus-driven” approach to doing anything. Adobe is so risk averse that it continually chops and changes its product lineup at the first sign of “failure” and has been clueless about the viability and pricing of products for years, certainly dating back to when I still worked there. Part of their stated reason for buying Macromedia was to improve how they worked with their community, by learning from Macromedia, but that effort seems to have been completely abandoned over the last half decade and they seem to constantly shoot their community in the foot with lack of communication and bizarre / random product direction changes. Last year I realized I no longer used any Adobe software – I’d switched to cheaper and/or better alternatives for everything. It felt very strange uninstalling Creative Suite and all their standalone software after it had been such a staple in my daily workflow for so many years previous. Strange, but also very liberating. I certainly wouldn’t bet my business or my reputation on Adobe these days…

  37. I agree with Steve Burns that Adobe needs to see apps as sophisticated tools rather than mini apps.

    For some decades now (I go back to PS v.1.0) I’ve felt that Adobe has suffered from “largessosity.” If a competing product looks like it’s actually making some real money, Adobe just tries to buy it out to get it off the market or if unable to do so, just bring in some software geeks and add the competing features to its existing products. If a small prototype product isn’t a really super-big win right out the gate, it seems that bottom-line-watching managers feel that some VP upstairs is hungry to exercise his or her power and so the managers fear losing their jobs and become all too willing to throw the fledgling product under the bus. And, frankly, things like apps are just “lite” for truly serious macro-thinking product managers and VPs whose life work is to “climb to the top.” It seems that Steve’s use of the notion of an app being a “sophisticated tool” might well be a tag that will allow Adobe management to see apps in a more profitable light.

  38. I agree with Steve Burns that Adobe needs to see apps as sophisticated tools rather than mini apps.

    For some decades now (I go back to PS v.1.0) I’ve felt that Adobe has suffered from “largessosity.” If a competing product looks like it’s actually making some real money, Adobe just tries to buy it out to get it off the market or if unable to do so, just bring in some software geeks and add the competing features to its existing products. If a small prototype product isn’t a really super-big win right out the gate, it seems that bottom-line-watching managers feel that some VP upstairs is hungry to exercise his or her power and so the managers fear losing their jobs and become all too willing to throw the fledgling product under the bus. And, frankly, things like apps are just “lite” for truly serious macro-thinking product managers and VPs whose life work is to “climb to the top.” It seems that Steve’s use of the notion of an app being a “sophisticated tool” might well be a tag that will allow Adobe management to see apps in a more profitable light.

  39. Albert Peña says:

    @Pariah. Thank you for posting on the Linkedin Adobe Illustrator Group. I read through a majority of all the responses. Agree with a multitude of you on here. Using Adobe products since 1996? I believe? and since that day ONE of my first Photoshop class at the Art Institute of Dallas.
    I have noticed how Adobe recklessly changes software like NOBODY ever pays attention. So my hope is that this and other discussions and responses are fruitful. Look forward to reading more and see what transpires on this particular topic. THANKS AGAIN! Pariah for your posting. Regards!

  40. Albert Peña says:

    @Pariah. Thank you for posting on the Linkedin Adobe Illustrator Group. I read through a majority of all the responses. Agree with a multitude of you on here. Using Adobe products since 1996? I believe? and since that day ONE of my first Photoshop class at the Art Institute of Dallas.
    I have noticed how Adobe recklessly changes software like NOBODY ever pays attention. So my hope is that this and other discussions and responses are fruitful. Look forward to reading more and see what transpires on this particular topic. THANKS AGAIN! Pariah for your posting. Regards!

  41. I just got off a call with some people at Adobe, including Jill Soley, the author of the original Touch Apps EOL blog post. There’s nothing concrete to report yet, but a lot of poeople within Adobe are doing quite a lot of talking and brainstorming toward figuring out ways to avoid snafus like this in the future.

  42. I just got off a call with some people at Adobe, including Jill Soley, the author of the original Touch Apps EOL blog post. There’s nothing concrete to report yet, but a lot of poeople within Adobe are doing quite a lot of talking and brainstorming toward figuring out ways to avoid snafus like this in the future.

  43. HI Pariah,

    Thank you for taking the time to write this open letter, I will make sure to add the #AdobeTouch hashtag when I share your post, as it certainly sums up my own feelings on the untimely demise of Adobe Touch apps.

    It was certainly a shock to lose such promising apps, especially after integrating them into my workflow. Funnily enough I found Collage (the least morned) the most useful app of the lot as it provide a quick way to build a mood board while working on design concepts.

    One thing that I think may have been overlooked in this discussion is the arrival of Windows 8, which brings the touch experience to the desktop, laptop and tablet form factors. CES 2013 has brought with it a raft of new devices which are far more powerful than an iPad or Android from a Creative professionals standpoint as they are capable of running full the full blow CS apps.

    Most of these new Windows “Tablet” devices come with a highly accurate stylus as well which negates the need for purpose built touch apps such as PS Touch. I know if I had the choice between a cutdown version of Photoshop or the real deal in a similar form factor with the accuracy and pressure sensitivity of a stylus, I would choose the later.

    So with the above in mind I think it’s only a matter of time before most of us get tired of carrying around multiple devices and paying for apps that only provide a small fraction of the creative options that a desktop class application provides.

    Still, I liked the simplicity of a the Adobe Touch apps, and they will be sorely missed from my workflow.

    Cheers, sf d-)=

  44. HI Pariah,

    Thank you for taking the time to write this open letter, I will make sure to add the #AdobeTouch hashtag when I share your post, as it certainly sums up my own feelings on the untimely demise of Adobe Touch apps.

    It was certainly a shock to lose such promising apps, especially after integrating them into my workflow. Funnily enough I found Collage (the least morned) the most useful app of the lot as it provide a quick way to build a mood board while working on design concepts.

    One thing that I think may have been overlooked in this discussion is the arrival of Windows 8, which brings the touch experience to the desktop, laptop and tablet form factors. CES 2013 has brought with it a raft of new devices which are far more powerful than an iPad or Android from a Creative professionals standpoint as they are capable of running full the full blow CS apps.

    Most of these new Windows “Tablet” devices come with a highly accurate stylus as well which negates the need for purpose built touch apps such as PS Touch. I know if I had the choice between a cutdown version of Photoshop or the real deal in a similar form factor with the accuracy and pressure sensitivity of a stylus, I would choose the later.

    So with the above in mind I think it’s only a matter of time before most of us get tired of carrying around multiple devices and paying for apps that only provide a small fraction of the creative options that a desktop class application provides.

    Still, I liked the simplicity of a the Adobe Touch apps, and they will be sorely missed from my workflow.

    Cheers, sf d-)=

  45. Looking for replacement tablet apps? I wrote a piece on CreativePro.com providing replacements for Adobe Touch Apps. http://www.creativepro.com/article/replacing-adobe-touch-apps

    Many creative pros’ workflows are disrupted by the discontinuation of Adobe’s Touch Apps—other creatives never even got to try them. Pariah Burke found the apps you need to replace Adobe Touch Apps on your iPad, iPhone, and Android tablets and phones.

  46. Looking for replacement tablet apps? I wrote a piece on CreativePro.com providing replacements for Adobe Touch Apps. http://www.creativepro.com/article/replacing-adobe-touch-apps

    Many creative pros’ workflows are disrupted by the discontinuation of Adobe’s Touch Apps—other creatives never even got to try them. Pariah Burke found the apps you need to replace Adobe Touch Apps on your iPad, iPhone, and Android tablets and phones.

  47. T. A Brunemeyer says:

    I do flags, I do banners, I do signs. Little ol’ men and women come in and want flags banners and signs. The have no idea what a PC is let alone vector or raster art. I am not an artist or I don’t call myself one but it’s nice when I can whip out my iPad take a snap and build a new piece for my customer. Now I am not their yet I can get around in Illustrator and inkscape but when I found ideas the other day I thought to myself ‘this is gonna be good’ now I see that though ideas isn’t gone (yet?) support and hype for the touch apps is waning (or thats the impression Im getting).
    Personally I say push this stuff. A Ps that’s so simple my father can use it but has enough depth for power users. Ideas, think about it, so simple a kindergartener can use it that produces pieces that can be used for any size or media out there. As to the rest of em. I haven’t played with em yet but I want Kuler on my iPad. I need to have color matching (PMS please)otherwise it’s all guess work and having some customer say “I didn’t want that blue, I wanted THAT blue” really bites.

  48. T. A Brunemeyer says:

    I do flags, I do banners, I do signs. Little ol’ men and women come in and want flags banners and signs. The have no idea what a PC is let alone vector or raster art. I am not an artist or I don’t call myself one but it’s nice when I can whip out my iPad take a snap and build a new piece for my customer. Now I am not their yet I can get around in Illustrator and inkscape but when I found ideas the other day I thought to myself ‘this is gonna be good’ now I see that though ideas isn’t gone (yet?) support and hype for the touch apps is waning (or thats the impression Im getting).
    Personally I say push this stuff. A Ps that’s so simple my father can use it but has enough depth for power users. Ideas, think about it, so simple a kindergartener can use it that produces pieces that can be used for any size or media out there. As to the rest of em. I haven’t played with em yet but I want Kuler on my iPad. I need to have color matching (PMS please)otherwise it’s all guess work and having some customer say “I didn’t want that blue, I wanted THAT blue” really bites.